Thanks to Tony R Kuphaldt.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Jampo, Aug 9, 2015.

  1. Jampo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 6, 2015
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    Er, I think I'm in the right place to post this, but thanks go to Tony for the clarity in his Electronics Textbook. I'm only reading on AC in Volume 1 now. The clear statement that Volts are a measure of energy connected other several things. Also the explicit differentiation between the conventional flow and electron flow notations cleared up several other mysteries.

    Paging through the Volumes (in downloading the pdf's) showed there are a whole cornucopia of new and clear ideas that will expand my knowledge of electronics widely. This is very exciting, there's a whole new world waiting in them thar books.

    Thank you kindly, good sir.
     
  2. bertus

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  3. Jampo

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    Aug 6, 2015
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  4. crutschow

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    To be precise, a volt is a unit of electromotive force (EMF) not energy. It only generates energy when it is pushing electron charge through a resistance.
    The unit of this energy is a Joule (1 Volt moving 1 Coulomb of charge).
    And the unit of power is a Watt, which is one Joule per second.

    Volts are similar to the pressure (PSI) in a water pipe. It indicates the presence of potential energy but is not energy by itself.
     
  5. Jampo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 6, 2015
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    Bertus,

    I think I've come home. Did the RCA Autotext course some years ago, but this is a whole different world. I am very sure I will find answers to many a puzzle that came up in building some small projects. Just looking at the contents index of Volume 6 astounds me in its completeness.

    This is going to be a joyride.

    On the topic of attachments, I may be of some help. I am not at all connected to companies or things I mention from here on in. The software I use to create PDF's is CutePDFWriter. You use it as a printer for, say, even single pages on worksheets in workbooks. PDFtools is another free software tool to split, merge and do other things to PDF's. You may look at the free MWSnap for screenshots or part of screens et al to create .jpeg files.

    Then the big one. I say this simply because it is excellent work. Yozosoft started as Evermore Integrated Office 2007. It is the Chinese Office suite with a distinct difference. Your Word processor, Spreadsheet and Presentation is sited in One single Binder and it uses just one file format for all of this. The apps are also fully interactive. It is written in Java and can be installed in Windows and Linux, I'm not sure of the Mac, most likely. It has a Science Editor that is afraid of nothing. You can even edit proper differential and integral calculus equations in it for scientific papers. You may also create your own graphics as a collection of Autoshapes and store them in the Editor for later use, drag and drop. I bought it in desperation against the high prices of other similar software. This is the only software on this laptop that I paid for.

    It is very reminiscent of the Gold Disk Office suite on the old Amiga A500. This works. Period.

    Ciao.
     
  6. Jampo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 6, 2015
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  7. Jampo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 6, 2015
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    Sorry Bertus, this actually goes to Crutchkow. I clicked on Reply to that response and got here. My site navigation is not up to scratch yet.

    You are correct in some of your statements, but I kindly beg to differ on your first comment. On page 17 under point 1.4. Voltage and Current in Kuphaldt's Textbook you will find the quote of which I include a copy below here. If I remember correctly from my failed Applied Math I, energy is a scalar and force a vector, it has direction. I think I understand Tony correctly when he says voltage describes the difference in energy between (always) two points. The lack of this specific understanding and failure in distinction actually led to my failure in AM I. Taught me to RTFM all right!

    "This potential energy, stored in the form of an electric charge imbalance and capable of
    provoking electrons to flow through a conductor, can be expressed as a term called voltage,
    which technically is a measure of potential energy per unit charge of electrons, or something a
    physicist would call specific potential energy. Defined in the context of static electricity, voltage
    is the measure of work required to move a unit charge from one location to another, against the
    force which tries to keep electric charges balanced. In the context of electrical power sources,
    voltage is the amount of potential energy available (work to be done) per unit charge, to move
    electrons through a conductor."

    Go Tony!
     
  8. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    Okay, I stand corrected, as long as you understand that a Volt is not a unit of energy but indicates potential energy.
     
  9. Jampo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 6, 2015
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    Crutshow,

    Thanks for taking time on this. This specific differentiation is what dropped the penny for me. In Physics I, energy was a totally new concept and I just could not get a grip on it. Even in my RCA Autotext Electronics course, the very basic stuff Tony starts with are taken as read. The anecdotal stories about Coulomb et al already changed my perspectives. Watts the same. Like knots (sea miles per hour) it is no simple quantity. It is is a rate, also called a speed.

    Thanks again. Had another epiphany. Measuring volts in parallel is just looking at the height of the pumped water. Cutting the wire to measure amps, makes you stand inside the pipe and feel the rush of water on your shoulders coming down. But here's the riddle. In electronics, you are made aware that below 20VDC things could be safe, but don't fall for it. A capacitor can kill you, but there aint no 220VAC! How come? Amps! Energy flowing so fast you can't handle it! But it's not just the height that causes the speed.

    What's wrong with this picture? Or right for that matter? This is the nature of the beastie I'm after. When you go lion hunting, you have to stalk very carefully.

    Greetings and Salutations!
    This is a joyride!

    Jampo.
     
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