testing of OEN relay 67 series

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by IKCTRAJAN, Jan 10, 2016.

  1. IKCTRAJAN

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 6, 2016
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    while screening of component how we can check OEN MAKE RELAY VIDE THEIR PART NO.67EP242C7 AS PER ATTACHED DATA SHEET.
     
  2. Dodgydave

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 22, 2012
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    Apply the correct coil voltage, and see if the contacts changes over...
     
  3. IKCTRAJAN

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 6, 2016
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    will u pl. reply in details refering catelogue how much voltage to be applied on which particular point & what sholud be correct result we should we get? as i am totally new for such type of relay.
     
  4. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    Are we going to do this for all the components in tour project? Please buy a book about quality testing electronic components. One about general electronics might also help. You need some practice on how to read Datasheets. Most actually show the test setup used.
     
  5. sailorjoe

    Member

    Jun 4, 2013
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    Ikctrajan, there are lots of things to test in a relay, but I'll guess that first you just want to know if the relay will click on-off. Your part number indicates that your relay is 67EP242C7, which means:
    Series 67, type DC Power Adjusted Epoxy Sealed Metal Cover, a coil voltage of 24 VDC, with 2 poles, a Changer Over, and a 7 Amp rating on the contacts.
    The data sheet seems to show that the coil resistance should be 90 ohms. So start by measuring the coil resistance with a multimeter.
    It also seems to indicate that you only need 8 volts to click the relay, so use a 9 Volt battery and a couple of test leads (wires with clips on the ends) and wire the battery to the coil of the relay. Just touch one of the wires to the battery for a second, and you should hear the relay click.
    To be safe, just measure the coil resistance and tell us what you get.
    And by the way, this relay is optimized to switch DC current up to 7 Amps, but not for switching AC current.
     
  6. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Plug in to Google Ice Cube relay wiring.
    Max.
     
  7. IKCTRAJAN

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 6, 2016
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    sorry it is 67EP482C7 RELAY .pl. tell me what to be check for this relay i will forward result immediately.
     
  8. sailorjoe

    Member

    Jun 4, 2013
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    No problem, please do the same thing recommended before. Start by measuring the resistance of the coil with a multimeter. The updated part number means you have a 48 volt coil, not 24. But let's check it to be sure.
     
  9. IKCTRAJAN

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 6, 2016
    37
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    as per catelogue drg. i checked at point 1 & 4 & result is 2500 ohm.
    pl. reply complete procedure to check this relay for screening purpose ie before soldering it to circuit.
     
  10. sailorjoe

    Member

    Jun 4, 2013
    361
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    OK, good! You have a 48 volt coil. The data sheet says that this coil should work with at least 38.4 volts across it.
    So you need a power source for about 40 to 48 volts, and at least 20 milliamps. You can get this with five 9 volt batteries connected in series.
    Then you should be able to connect one end of the battery string to pin 1 of the relay, and the other end to pin 4, and you will hear the relay click. Release the connection, and the relay should click again.
    If you get there, then use your multimeter to make sure the relay contacts are working. With the coil un-energized, put your multimeter leads across pins 5 and 6, and you should read a very low resistance value. Now energize the coil, and your reading should be an open circuit. Do the same thing on pins 8 and 9.
    On pins 6 and 7 you should see the opposite. With the coil un-energized, your reading should be an open circuit. When you energize the coil, your reading should be a very low value. Same with pins 9 and 10.
    The contact resistance you're measuring should be less than 50 milli-ohms (0.050 ohms). Anything higher, and you likely have burned contact points, and you should not use the relay.
    Let us know what you find out, please.
     
  11. IKCTRAJAN

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 6, 2016
    37
    0
    first of all thanks for ur keen interest in my question & for giving detailed step wise answer.
    now following is the result i got as per ur above procedure
    0) i have 0 -230 vdc variable power supply so first i connect to point 1&4 of relay & gradually increased supply from 0 to 48 v.
    i heard a click in relay at 28 v.
    1) same way after reaching 48 v i gradually decrease the supply from 48 to 0 & i heard a click in relay at 7 v.
    2) all point contacts results are perfectly ok as per ur above results but i do not have mili ohm meter & reading on my dmmeter was around 0.5 ohm with beep sound of continuity.
    so now pl. reply ur conclusion of the test results wrt require results of relay.
     
  12. sailorjoe

    Member

    Jun 4, 2013
    361
    63
    I think you're good to go. Use the relay in your circuit with confidence.
     
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