Testing high voltage circuit on breadboard

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Randa Mohamed, Sep 2, 2015.

  1. Randa Mohamed

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 19, 2015
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    Hello everyone, I was wondering if i can test a high voltage circuit on a breadboard (more than 358 volts peak to peak) for example test an auxiliary supply circuit that inputs 240 volts rms to a transformer and outputs 5 volts from a voltage regulator.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. MikeML

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 2, 2009
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  3. Randa Mohamed

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 19, 2015
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    Oh my bad...
     
  4. Randa Mohamed

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 19, 2015
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    How can i delete the post ?
     
  5. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Actually, as long as you are using a trandformer, it is indeed legal. We do not ban AC circuits, just transformerless power supplies.

    Having said that, most breadboard schemes are designed for low voltages only. You would be safer if you went to another scheme, as in a piece of pine board with terminals screwed into it. This was the original breadboard of all others, using a wooden breadboard dates back to the beginning.

    Could we see a schematic of what you are talking about? Schematics are the true language of electronics.
     
  6. Randa Mohamed

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 19, 2015
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    Thanks a lot Wendy for the clarification, below is the circuit that im intending to test

    I'm just wondering if the wires used to connect AC to the primary side of the transformer could handle this high voltage

    auxiliary.png
     
  7. WBahn

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    Mar 31, 2012
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    Echoing what Wendy said, you want to keep the high voltage stuff off the breadboard -- that is asking serious problems and medical bills. Mount your high-voltage circuitry safely (such as to a wood board that is secure enough that the transformer won't be sliding around or flipping over) along with things like power switches and fuses. Then bring your low voltage outputs off of it and into your solderless breadboard.
     
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  8. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
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    If it is a pc board style transformer, the odds are that the pins are too fat to fit in the proto board sockets anyway. But if they aren't, you could solder AC line cord wires to the transformer primary and insulate them with spaghetti tubing or tape, then plug the secondary into the proto board and go on from there.

    ak
     
  9. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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    There is a simplier way, if the diode bridges are beefy enough current wise. Interested?
     
  10. Randa Mohamed

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 19, 2015
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    Thank you all for replying

    @WBahn I agree with you, securing the transformer on a wood board is a good idea, the thing is that im planning to use a pcb mount transformer.

    @AnalogKid since im using a pcb mount transformer, i think i need to get a cable with good insulation then for testing.

    @Wendy well im interested in learning, but explain to me what do you mean by "beefy enough"
     
  11. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    If the diodes can take the current, you only need one diode bridge.

    [​IMG]

    Just connect two of the leads of your transformer together. Be sure you don't get it backwards, where the phases cancel and you get no voltage out the outside leads.
     
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