Testing Coulomb's Law!

Discussion in 'Electronics Resources' started by vilyanur, Jul 8, 2014.

  1. vilyanur

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 8, 2014
    2
    0
    Hello all so as I can see in this website http://electronicspani.com/coulombs-law/

    the formula for coulomb's law is:
    [​IMG]

    So that means If I take two charges of one coulomb each and place them one meter apart in vacuum that will result in about 8.9875 * 10^9 Newton of force! isn't it? Isn't that too much of force?!? In real life I cannot see charges being attracted with that much of energy!
     
  2. vilyanur

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 8, 2014
    2
    0
    So s far as I know one coulomb charge is one ampere per second. So if I place two positive and negative wire with one ampere load in between the the wire does not seem to attract each other with such tremendous force!
     
  3. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    13,016
    3,235
    You have it backward. An ampere is one coulomb per second. But for the attraction to work and to use that formula the coulomb must be a free point charge with no opposite charge to cancel it. In a wire most of the negative electron charge of the free carriers is balanced by the positive protons in the atoms' nucleus so you see little electrostatic net force.
     
  4. BR-549

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 22, 2013
    1,995
    388
    Hello. That force you state is the force between two charges. If the charges are equal....the force(whether attractive or repulsive) will be equally divided between the two charges. So one coulomb of charge is half that number of force. Now there is a device that we use to store charge. It's called a Leiden jar, a condenser and now a capacitor. If you study capacitors and capacitance, a capacitor of 1 farad is one coulomb of charge per volt. If you study how to safely charge and discharge capacitors.....you will see that just a fraction of one coulomb can be quite impressive. There is another device that can store current like the capacitor stores charge(voltage). It's called an inductor, it's impressive also. When you put these two together......it's magic.
     
  5. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
    2,449
    428
    except that a capacitor can store a charge for an apreciable time, an inductor can not store current for very long. when the charging source is removed, it discharges its self thrugh its own resistance.
     
  6. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    13,016
    3,235
    Unless, of course, it's a superconducting coil inductor. ;)
     
  7. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
    2,449
    428
    and then of course, if its ends are connected before the current colapses.
     
Loading...