testing 6V AC horns

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Abuello, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. Abuello

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 16, 2012
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    Hi,
    I need to figure out a way to bench test a 6V 4 amp AC scooter horn. The power (on scooter) is powered by an AC magneto. I'm thinking I would start with an AC step down transformer?
    Thanks for any help..

    Abuello
     
  2. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    1,605
    24 watts for a scooter horn? That seems like a lot, but again it might be aimed at an older, somewhat hearing impaired audience.

    But yeah, a step down transformer should do the task. Radio Shack has a 12.6VCT/3A for 12 bucks... center tap to either end is 6.3VAC or close enough. Current by your spec is low but I think the spec may too high anyway. Not like it will explode for a short test.

    I would never suggest you clip this to the line, try the horn, then return the unit back to the Shack. <wink> <wink>
     
  3. Abuello

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 16, 2012
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    Hi,
    Thanks for the lead. Yes, it seems these little devils do require that kind of power. They are so pathetic sounding in the first place. They sound more like a loud buzzer than a horn. Not to mention, due to the magneto output being tied to the RPMs, the sound level varies. But, this was the norm in the 50s-60s. Here is a pic...
     
  4. Abuello

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 16, 2012
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    Thanks! I found the P/N t be 273-1511-A. However, quality being what it is these days, the reviews seem to indicate a high failure rate. HMMM?
    Later ken
     
  5. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    I had a scooter like that back in the late 50's. It was made by Vespa/Piaggio, but it was marketed by Sears as a "Super Crusaire." I had a lot of fun (and a fair amount of pain) with it.

    ETA: Looks like the one in your picture has inflicted its share of scrapes and bruises.
     
  6. Abuello

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 16, 2012
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    0
    Hi,
    The one in the pic is a 66 Sears Blue badge, that currently, has been totally rebuilt and is awaiting final paint. I included a pic of what it will look like when completed. That "Blue Badge" by '66 replaced the Allstate emblem and was out fitted with a 150 cc engine vs. the 125 in the earlier model (Cruisaire).
    The Cruisaire, to which you refer, is their Allstate Cruisaire model which I also own and is a '64. The 66 was the last year Sears carried the Vespa line, although, the inventory lasted a little while longer.
    ..and yes the horns are pathetic squeaky buzzing sounding devices. But, that's what they were.
    In the late 50s the the Allstate line paint scheme changed from green to red. Also, the Piaggio line went from the handlebar setup to the more familiar headset similar to mine, a molded headset.
     
  7. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    The pictures brought back a lot of memories. Mine was sort of a baby blue color, and had the ribbed rubber/metal pieces on the floorboard. It had a three speed manual transmission, and a speedometer. I know it had a horn, but I honestly don't remember its location.

    The seat was a one-person seat, and I think the owner's manual specifically recommended against carrying a passenger.

    If my memory serves me, it topped out at 43 mph (which was the speed at which I usually rode it.) It was two-stroke of course, and seeing your picture reminded me of the reserve gas tank, which I ran on quite a lot.

    On the left rear, it had a storage compartment. I made gas money by picking up empty soft drink bottles and returning them for the refund, which was 2 cents each, or 3 cents if I wanted to ride across the Tennessee River bridge to the adjoining county. But, then gas was less than 25 cents per gallon.

    So, what's a rebuilt worth these days?
     
  8. Abuello

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 16, 2012
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    0
    Hi all,
    What am I thankful for this week? It's the replies I received from you guys that eventually led me to a step down AC transformer. I located a transformer at a local Radio Shack , whose output is rated at 12s AC at 3 Amps or can be reduced to 6Vs. The cost was $12.00 and the P/N is 273-1511B.
    Thanks guys and "Happy Thanksgiving"!
    Ken
     
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