Teachers on the forum, untie!

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by tshuck, Apr 26, 2013.

  1. tshuck

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    I noticed there are a number of professional teachers here, so I started thinking, "What classes do they teach?

    Instead of hunting each suspected teacher down and asking individually, a thread is better suited to the task.

    So, what classes/subjects do/did you teach?

    How long have you been teaching, or did you teach?

    What are your favorite classes to teach?
     
    Eric007 likes this.
  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Untie?....
     
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  3. tshuck

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    It is a reference to a protester that misspelled unite, I thought it was funny...

    :p

    ...maybe it was a joke, the internet is a convoluted mess of information!
     
  4. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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    Kinda like the "SOPT" sign...


    Oh yeah...the teaching,it's post secondary . I teach Basic Electronics , a 20 month class. I also teach Industrial Electricity, a 16 month class
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2013
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  5. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    "Dyslexics of the world, UNTIE!"

    First thing I thought of when I read the title of this thread :D

    By "teachers", do you mean professionally, or do unofficial tutors count?

    I've been an electronics lab technician at a university in Boston, and often find myself tutoring the students in the labs. Anything from Physics, to Electronics Design (circuits, projects, prototypes), to higher-level mathematics, to computer technology. Some of the students have even become regulars, and I have come to think of them as my own students.

    I have actually considered becoming an assistant professor at some point, though I think that requires special training, which I have not had. We will see what happens though. It's an option, anyway.
     
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  6. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    That's the one I was trying to remember!

    I did a guest lecture at a vocational school. Three minutes drawing a basic 4 wire thermostat diagram, I turn around and every person in the class except 1 had gone to sleep. That cured me of thinking I could teach!

    The problem is the intensity of the frustration I felt. Those kids were probably in vocational school because they thought it was "easier" than "real" school. Wrong audience!
     
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  7. tshuck

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    ...maybe that was it, but I remember seeing on a sign, but it could have been altered...
    Sure! I had intended it to mean professional, but that is only because I didn't think about it likes that....
    I would like to go back and teach at some point, also. I wasn't aware of needing special training, perhaps it's a state/university thing?

    I think you'd make a great professor, judging from what I've seen of you here.
     
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  8. tshuck

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    You must have been teaching a bunch of narcoleptics! I can't think of much harder than trying to teach people that don't care...
     
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  9. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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    Truer words were never spoken..
     
  10. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    The problem is the really poor work ethic of kids these days!

    Everyone is rich (compared to when I was kid and only some families had phones, and maybe 2/3 of families had cars) and we would walk to school, and got caned if we talked back in class, and actually had to pay attention.

    These days kids get driven to school doorstep in ONE of their parents cars, have iPhone apps that do everything for them so they don;t have to think, can doze off in class with no punishment, get home and get their homework answers for free off the internet with no work.

    We're breeding an entire new generation of stupid useless lazy people. Especially here in the west.

    Now in China the kids study their butts off, queue up 5000 deep for interviews for 5 minimum wage jobs, and only get hired if they are the very best.

    If you look at the futures of both cultures it does not look good. :(
     
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  11. 1chance

    Member

    Nov 26, 2011
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    I am a high school/adjunct college instructor teaching math in the high school setting. My classes include college algebra, college statistics, college trigonometry, college calculus I, algebra II and honors algebra I. One of my sections of college algebra & also the trig is done via ITV, that is I am the long distance instructor for two other schools as well as my own location. They view me/I them by television with interaction via sound and document cameras. This is my 27th year teaching and I plan on retiring after my 28th year.
     
  12. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    That's terrific, 1chance. You have my geat respect. Sorry the thread that was supposed to honor teachers devolved to the usual carping and ranting.
     
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  13. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    Good for you 1Chance. My only exposure to ITV was a small school in western oklahoma ... but it was a very long time after I graduated from a school 2000 miles to the east.

    I still think that ITV is a good program, to allow teachers to further their sphere of influence over young minds.

    Did you just wash your hands and can't control your fingers?
     
  14. killivolt

    Active Member

    Jan 10, 2010
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    1chance, ITV, I always hear new terms?

    What we do here is "Video Teleconferencing" from a local University in Utah, I only know this form of Distance Education. We broadcast the " Presentation plus the Image of the Professor at the same time " to local High Schools with (H.323 Duo Video H.264 Audio.) I'm sure it's similar.

    We have around 25 sites, with HD reception, in each room were running between 5 to 10 classes in the day and 1 or 2 at night. The Military use the same system.

    I'm over the operations of 2 rooms with 50 plus seats and 2 with 25, plus 9 part time "Student Techs" who assist the Professor change sources and handle the equipment.

    I know how difficult this can be grading papers, plus do regular classes at the same time.

    Thank you, for all your hard work and dedication, it's a joy and a pleasure to be a part of motivated and talented individuals such as yourself:)

    Regards,
    kv
     
  15. happyganl

    Active Member

    Dec 17, 2009
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    :)Hope you post more thread,I like to read
     
  16. 1chance

    Member

    Nov 26, 2011
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    Yes, this is a good description of ITV. I am scheduled to get upgraded to HD this summer. This will be the 4th tech upgrade in the 7 years I have been doing ITV (14 years for dual credit). We got fiber optic cables 3 years ago.
    The biggest challenge I face is the different schedules among the various schools. While we all have the same "master schedule", it doesn't account for weather, early outs and activities which take the students out of class. One of my remote sites is truly remote, in the Ozark Mountains, and they have numerous snow/ice days in the winter. We have them, too, but not always at the same time due to the distance & geographic differences. Thank goodness for e-mail & scanners as that is how I send/receive all tests & note outlines to my students. We still use snail mail for homework. I try and limit my class size to 20, but usually it ends up around 25 as I always have 10 - 12 from my school alone. We have 25 - 30 schools in the "MITE-network" that are scattered all across Missouri with the home educational institution being Central Methodist University (my alma mater). I may continue teaching for them after retirement, haven't made up my mind yet. If I do, it will be to continue being a part of the education process, not for the money (it's minimal). Each school in the network has to either provide an instructor or pay a sizeable fee. In addition, there are instruction sites at the university and also several towns around the state. We call the guy who oversees/keeps the system working "God" as he is all-knowing and can pop-up messages on our screens at any time and do things like log us in remotely when things are on the blink. Electrical storms are the worst as they can really mess with conductivity and cause the local servers or the whole network to go down. It's amazing that it works as well as it does (about 99% of the time). I've only lost 1 1/2 class periods this semester due to system issues. I can't imagine how they will improve the system further in the future, but I'm sure they will.
     
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  17. killivolt

    Active Member

    Jan 10, 2010
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    Here in our area we have a few fiber runs, they are changing them out, little by little. Our MCUs are full HD, but we still have some sites that are still Standard Def.

    We have Digital Recorders and we off load content to a Server, we give the students access and they can view it from the Web or we can connect directly to their Codec and Playback the Recording during lunch or after school. It is hectic at times but, I respect your patients for the Modality of Instruction, we have Instructional Designers who assist the Professors with their content, and Core Specialist who help with all the Scanning and such, in addition to Facilitators at the Sites to assist the Students with their needs.

    We use Management Software and I'm in the (Video Operations end of things)
    I've never been called "God" sounds funny, my professors due appreciate our help and service. I like using aspects of the software to send those kinds of messages, especially when I'm frustrated at a site and the Facilitator is on the phone, there is no other way to contact them.

    I love it when the students have to tell the Facilitator that I'm trying to contact them, they quickly hang up and call me in desperation. (Gabbing on the Phone isn't part of the job), when it comes to tests, the Students know their is a second set of eyes on them at all times, so no funny business or they will get 0 on the test.

    We just caught one Friday Morning. He had a piece of paper in his jacket pocket. He said, I couldn't read the print, it was to small? Sorry, thats not the point you were cheating. It was his final.

    I know, I really like HD.

    Regards,
    kv
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2013
  18. killivolt

    Active Member

    Jan 10, 2010
    367
    317
    FYI, I need to give Credit where Credit is due. Taking a shower helped me to remember why I'm a member of this site and others.

    Without the Software Designers and Electrical Engineers such as AAC, I wouldn't have a job or receive credit.

    I say "Thank you" for you for all your hard work and dedication.

    Respectfully yours,
    kv
     
  19. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
    4,884
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    I live on a cul de sac road. The road could not be more than a few hundred meters. We have parents that drive down to the bottom of the road to wait for their precious little darlings and leave their engings running while waiting.


    The bus stops every few meters along the main road. In the morning the kids are rarely at the bus stop in time. Bus pulls up and they are still a distance away, taking their good old time to get to the waiting bus that is blocking traffic.
     
  20. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
    17,746
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    I have been "teaching" for nearly 40 years, even though I am only 48. I joined a youth organization, Highlanders, for kids ages 8-18 when I was 7 (hey, rules were meant to be broken, right) that was run by the kids and overseen by the adults. This worked in part because you could not join once you turned 11 and so the older kids had also been members for many years. Although the organization folded when I was 12, I was already in charge of training for about a dozen younger kids and responsible for teaching classes on the basic topics to as many as fifty or so kids at a time. As part of this organization I completed both Toastmasters International and the follow-on program Speak Well.

    After Highlanders folded I joined Civil Air Patrol and became a cadet leader in both it and, later, Junior ROTC and developed and taught many classes in aerospace education, leadership, wilderness survival, and search and rescue topics. I also commanded a drill team in each without any adult support or supervision whatsoever.

    So by the time I graduated from high school I had a surprising amount of experience teaching and clearly it was something I enjoyed and all indicators were that it was something I was reasonably good at. But after high school my passion was for engineering and that is where I focused by efforts for the next decade, although I continued feeding my teaching cravings by heavy involvement with CAP.

    About three years after getting my Masters ABD (All But Dissertation) and starting work for a small engineering firm I started teaching computer programming and electronics courses at the local university as an adjunct. Even as an adjunct I quickly became involved in curriculum development and was even the defacto course coordinator for the programming course overseeing two other instructors. After finally finishing my Masters officially, I started on my PhD work and stepped away from teaching, CAP, and flying in order to focus on school (since I was still a full-time engineer at work).

    A couple years later I got asked to teach full time at the Air Force Academy for one semester to cover for a professor on sabbatical. I was able to parlay that into a part-time research position there that provided me with the ideal research project for the dissertation. After that turned full-time (albeit with very unstable year-to-year funding) I quit my job at the engineering company (though I still consult for them). The funding for the research dried up about two years ago and since I was almost done with my PhD at that point I decided to pursue an academic position since I would like to complete my professional career educating the next generation of engineers. I am still looking for a stable, long-term position; it turns out that my broad background, which always served me very well, is now hurting me because, at the PhD level, they want deep expertise in a specific field. For the past year, since finishing my PhD, I have been a Visiting Assistant Teaching Professor at the Colorado School of Mines and have just found out that my position has been extended for another year. I have been teaching Comp Sci classes so far -- the Intro CS course, Computer Organization, Concepts of Programming Languages, and the Elements of Computing Systems (Nand2Tetris) course. Next semester I will be teaching the Elements course again (which I really think is a fabulous course) and the introductory linear circuits class (EE side of the house). They wanted me to teach the digital circuits course, but it conflicts with Elements. So I don't know what my other class will be yet -- possibly the Intro CS course or possibly the C++ course.

    The bad thing about teaching is that it pays about half what I was making as a research scientist. But that is a choice I made and am willing to live with it.
     
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