sticky question ?!?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Thomas.R, Mar 14, 2008.

  1. Thomas.R

    Thread Starter Member

    Aug 16, 2007
    20
    0
    Hallo,
    A little question about the sticky white substance they (manufacturers) use to hold connectors together. What is this? Can i use silicon from the DIY-shop?
     
  2. rwmoekoe

    Active Member

    Mar 1, 2007
    172
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    if what you mean is the grease between a heatsink and a processor or power transistor, that substance should be the silicon grease, which was there to help increase the thermal conduction between those two surfaces.
     
  3. nomurphy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 8, 2005
    567
    12
    There is a conductive lubricant that is sometimes used on connectors (mainly automotive), that keep the pins from corroding and prevent intermittent connections. It is not a glue or paste for holding the connectors together.
     
  4. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
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    Further, the silicone glues that smell like vinegar will corrode the metallic connector pins.
     
  5. n9352527

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 14, 2005
    1,198
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    Do you mean that milky glue? If so, I think it is hot melt glue, the same kind you get in glue gun from DIY shop.
     
  6. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
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    "Connectors" don't typically use silicon, as silicon is resistive. Do you refer to an antioxidant compound between connectors of dissimilar metal? Or is your "connector" actually a mechanical thermal bond?
     
  7. rwmoekoe

    Active Member

    Mar 1, 2007
    172
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    so, there is this conductive lubricant. can you please tell me more about it, nomurphy? thanks a lot.
     
  8. Søren

    Senior Member

    Sep 2, 2006
    472
    28
    Hi,

    I have never seen any "conductive lubricant" used on connectors and that would be risky in most instances.
    Different lubes are used for keeping oxygen from corroding the metals.
    If you wanna burn money, look at what eg. 3M has to offer, but if you just want to protect something which is not above the lower radio spectrum, Vaseline will do a decent job.

    Btw. The "Acid based RTV corrodes electrical contacts" is an often heard statement, but so far I have been unable to recreate it, so I tend to dismiss it as myth. Anyone with scientificially sound evidence sustaining the corroding theory, please put out :)
    Even if the acid was more aggressive than in RTV (which is hardly felt if left on the skin while working with it), the contact in contact with the "acid" is still hermetically sealed by the RTV, i.e. no oxygen for the process.

    The real bad thing about acid based RTV is the stench, but alco based RTV does not exactly smell like roses either.

    Just don't use the stuff with fungicide added if you're gonna chew on your connectors for some strange reason.
     
  9. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
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    It is not risky at all, and is quite common. It is required by code in many applications. "Lubricant" is a misnomer, of course. The goop is formulated to reduce galvanic action and oxidation. "No-Ox-Id" is one brand name.
     
  10. Søren

    Senior Member

    Sep 2, 2006
    472
    28
    Hi,

    I think you misread me?
    None of the oxide-retarder lubes I have seen have been conductive and I still think it would be risky to eg. smear something conductive into eg. a tight tolerance rotary switch - wouldn't take long before it was totally shorted.

    Did you ever try to measure conductivity of that No-Ox-Id stuff?
     
  11. DC_Kid

    Distinguished Member

    Feb 25, 2008
    638
    9
    the "glue" is most likely that found/used inside TV sets to hold things down and/or in place. most definitely is a good dielectric. my guess is its some sort of urethane compound.
     
  12. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
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    No. Why would I waste my time with such measurement? If the inspector does not see any oxide-proofing squeezing out from the connections, he or she red-tags the installation.

    Also, I don't understand how "connector" becomes "rotary switch." Clearly we are speaking of different things.
     
  13. Søren

    Senior Member

    Sep 2, 2006
    472
    28
    Hi,

    Perhaps to get a clear picture of its magnitude of conductivity (if any).
    Personally, I wouldn't like to drive a car if I didn't understand its inner workings.


    Nah, just ment as an example. It would be just as bad if it was a connector shunting out and "contact grease" is used in both connectors and contacts.
     
  14. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
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  15. nomurphy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 8, 2005
    567
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    Of course it's conductive. What would be the purpose of coating connector pin-pairs with an insulating material, and how would that improve connection reliability (other than by creating a permanent non-connection)?

    It is meant to be used carefully, it's not gorilla snot. And, it's not meant for cleaning such as spraying electrical cleaner into a pot, switch, or TV tuner. However, if you had slip-on wires to the pot or switch connections, instead of solder, you may want a conductive grease on each of the wire connectors.



    See link above from thingmaker3, it is one of many types out there.
     
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