ssop28 to dip28?

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by icydash, Aug 1, 2012.

  1. icydash

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 14, 2009
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    Hey guys, I need to work with an IC that's in a 28-pin SSOP package. I'd like to be able to test the circuit on a breadboard before making the PCB and soldering everything down. I know there are sockets available, but for some reason I can't seem to find anything reasonably priced. I know I've seen things like http://www.adapt-plus.com/products/adapters/prod_sotdip.html before for around $25 and a 28pin SSOP.

    Any ideas where I could get such a socket? I'm not really looking for an adapter/breakout board, as I'd like to do as little soldering as possible before being able to test on the breadboard.
     
  2. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    I use these. For under a buck twenty each I don't even bother to submit expense vouchers for them.
     
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  3. icydash

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 14, 2009
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    Thanks for the suggestion.

    I'd really like to not have to solder down the component, as this creates room for error (I'm not great with surface mount soldering yet), takes time, and it also means I have to buy another IC for the PCB (I don't know how to remove soldered down surface mount components). But if it's the only reasonably priced option, then I guess I'll have to go with it. Though, if I do have to do surface mount soldering, I'd really prefer an adapter that has the DIP pins already included like http://cimarrontechnology.com/narrowwidesoortssopto28-pindipadapterpn031102.aspx so I don't have to do as much soldering. I think that adapter only works with TSSOP though.
     
  4. bretm

    Member

    Feb 6, 2012
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    I totally get not wanting to solder, but have you tried surface mount soldering with hot air and solder paste? You can also use hot air to remove surface mounted components.

    Look how easy it is: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0XENpPtisnM

    The good bits are at 1:05 (smearing soldering paste on in the general vicinity of the pads), 1:35 (putting the components on the board in the general vicinity of the soldering paste), and 2:45 (magic).

    Hot air rework stations aren't too expensive, either.
     
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  5. icydash

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 14, 2009
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    Yeahhh I actually have tried it with my rework station and paste... never quite seems to come out like it does in the videos...

    Also, I just don't want to have to keep rebuying components because it costs like $7 in shipping fees alone to ship them to my house each time, so it's like a $12 proposition to get a few replacement surface mount parts.

    If possible, something like http://www.ebay.com/itm/SSOP28-TO-D...ultDomain_0&hash=item3caf7c53fe#ht_3178wt_939 would be ideal...if it was cheaper...
     
  6. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    I get the soldering problem, but if you keep at it it really isn't that hard to do. An SOIC like that is pretty eazy to solder: tin one corner pad, align the chip and touch that pin. Once you like it you solder the opposite corner pin. You can twist it a little as you solder the second pin, but if you do reflow the first pin (it has some strain on it) after you do a few more pins.

    The socket I showed you has holes to solder in 0.1" spaced pins so it will work like a DIP IC when you're finished. That same vendor also has these pins pretty cheap.

    If you want to unsolder one of these, either hot air or a hot plate is called for. You really need to get all the pins hot at the same time. It is not a kind thing to do to an IC and I only take them up to replace them and toss the one I got off (for the most part),

    $31 for a socket isn't a bad price. More then I would want to pay but not out of line.
     
  7. icydash

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 14, 2009
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  8. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    It's a TSSOP, only half of the pitch of SOIC. A little harder to solder.
    I use 50W station, plus small rectangular tip + flux + std. 1mm lead solder.

    Then I tack the chip at one corner, supply a little solder, and pull the tip (on the broad side) over the pins. When all excess solder is removed using the tip, I add flux again, and carefully pull the tip over all the pins in order to re-heat them. Plus optical inspection is neccessary for TSSOP.

    I can do them now within a few minutes, however, 2 years ago, I did not know how to do it properly, and it was very difficult + took a long time.

    What I figured out the exact angle is very important, so the broad surface can have contact with the solder pad, and pull off excess solder + distribute solder. Flux is essential here, it won't work without it.
     
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