square-wave inverter average power

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by notoriusjt2, Dec 1, 2010.

  1. notoriusjt2

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 4, 2010
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    [​IMG]

    my work so far

    [​IMG]

    I am having trouble with the last line

    what value should I use for "t" in this instance?
     
  2. t_n_k

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 6, 2009
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    782
    Well - "t" is the integration variable. You substitute the limits of integration for the terms in "t" in the resolved integral.

    Are you unsure of how to handle the exponential term?
     
  3. notoriusjt2

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 4, 2010
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    I am just trying to substitute values in for the variable and i dont know what to use for "t"

    i already have "T" and "tao" but not "t"
     
  4. t_n_k

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 6, 2009
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    Firstly you haven't completed the integration - that is done with respect to the variable "t". Do that bit first. I note that you have dropped the 'dt' term in the final line - perhaps that is where you are getting confused.

    You'll first have to square the terms within the square braces and integrate the (binomial) result. There will be resulting terms in t, e^(-t/τ) and e^(-2t/τ) - where τ is tau.

    Having completed the integration you would then substitute the limits of integration [0,0.00835] into the integrated function where the limits are t=0 and t=0.00835.

    You seem to be missing something important in your understanding of the integration process.
     
  5. t_n_k

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 6, 2009
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    Solution attached FYI.
     
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  6. notoriusjt2

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 4, 2010
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    THANK YOU!!!

    next semester I get to move back and take a calc class that actually explains these concepts to me, instead of asking me to figure it out on my own.
     
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