Spellchecker

Discussion in 'Feedback and Suggestions' started by Hypatia's Protege, Aug 6, 2015.

  1. Hypatia's Protege

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,229
    Is it just me of has the spellchecker become a lot dumber as of late?:rolleyes:

    No biggy but...:confused:

    Best regards
    HP
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,526
    2,369
    What browser are you using? I am always adding words to the Google S.C. with Chrome, but many are the British English version, but there are many word that it does not like/recognize.
    Max.
     
    Hypatia's Protege likes this.
  3. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,278
    6,790
    I was teaching the spell checker new words before I discovered AAC, and I wasn't even trying to use British, Latin, Spanish, or German! Some of us simply exceed the capacity of a computer generated dictionary. :(
     
    Hypatia's Protege likes this.
  4. Hypatia's Protege

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,229
    Thanks for your response!:)

    My browser is Firefox 39.0 running on MS windows 7 ultimate...

    FWIW the spellchecker seems to have lost the faculty of 'verbal proximity' --- In many cases simple transposition of 'i' and 'e' result in a list of incorrect suggestions:rolleyes: -- Moreover it now fails to recognize inflections of common words ("criticality" and "disassembly" being two particularly egregious examples)...

    Another (albeit longstanding) annoyance is its insistence upon New-World/colloquial spellings of certain words -- For example the spellchecker 'takes issue' with the following correctly spelled words: behaviour, artefact, colour, tyre, ardour, familiarise, initialise, harbour, metre, ionise...) to cite but a few recent aggravations:mad:

    Like I said -- no big deal but Jeeeezzzze!:rolleyes:

    Best regards
    HP
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2015
  5. Hypatia's Protege

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,229
    I'm referring specifically to the AAC auto-speller -- is there a way of establishing a personal (i.e. member specific) lexicon?

    Best regards
    HP
     
  6. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,526
    2,369
    I assume the *or (color) instead of *our (colour) is the American usage, like many of the other differences, #er instead of #re (Liter/Litre).
    How do you specify AAC A.S.?
    I assumed mine is Chrome/Google.
    Max.
     
    Hypatia's Protege likes this.
  7. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,278
    6,790
    I did not know that existed because I only attained spell-checker status when I enabled it for Firefox. My, "new" words ride with my browser, not my websites.
     
    Hypatia's Protege likes this.
  8. Hypatia's Protege

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,229
    So... Am I to understand that the spellchecker is a feature of my browser and nothing to do with AAC?:confused::cool:
     
  9. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,526
    2,369
    If you right click on a misspelled word, you should see a link or a clue in the list.
    Oddly my Chrome S.C. has an option for language, but American English is the only option!!
    Max.
     
    Hypatia's Protege likes this.
  10. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,278
    6,790
    It seems that way to me.
     
    Hypatia's Protege likes this.
  11. Hypatia's Protege

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,229
    Yup! 'Tis all my browser after all!:eek: --- In the words of E. Litella; "never mind..." --- Which, for the benefit of those unversed in the ways of ancient comedy 'my stupid!':oops::oops::oops:

    Abashedly
    HP
     
  12. Hypatia's Protege

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,229
    FWIW: As far as I'm concerned 'Colour', 'Litre', etc... are the correct spellings whereas 'color', 'liter', etc... are colloquialisms which should not, by any stretch of logic, be the default for any spell correction platform -- what's next? 'nite' vs 'night':rolleyes:

    Best regards
    HP

    PS: I've just noticed -- The SC does not object to 'nite'!!!:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:
     
    MaxHeadRoom likes this.
  13. ISB123

    Well-Known Member

    May 21, 2014
    1,239
    527
    Both ways of spelling are correct.I prefer American English since its "simpler".
     
    Hypatia's Protege likes this.
  14. paulktreg

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    611
    120
    Not biting. I'm not! :rolleyes:
     
    #12 and Hypatia's Protege like this.
  15. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,278
    6,790
    I thought that was Rosanne Rosanadana (Saturday Night Live, ~1968?) :confused:
    :D

    In the end, it doesn't matter much. I intentionally fracture several languages, just for fun. :p
     
    Hypatia's Protege likes this.
  16. Hypatia's Protege

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,229
    Actually: Emily Litella Ca. (originally) 1977 --- Owing to 'tender years' I missed the live broadcasts:(
    FWIW: Rosane Rosanada and Emily Litella were 'products' of the same performer (to wit: Gilda Radner)

    Re: spelling conventions:
    Probably A good move --- this sort of 'thing' tends to get 'political' rather quickly:eek:

    Best regards
    HP:)
     
    #12 likes this.
  17. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,526
    2,369
    It is hard to break old habits when when you were taught under a particular method.;)
    Max.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2015
    Hypatia's Protege likes this.
  18. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,278
    6,790
    Contemporary dictionaries continue to change. The authors say they are trying to reflect current use of words (as compared to correct use of words). It is my opinion that this is not the proper role of a dictionary and not an improvement.
     
    Hypatia's Protege likes this.
  19. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,526
    2,369
    I'm sure that dictionaries attempt to reflect the word usage as practiced in the country they are printed in.
    i.e. A spell checker of American origin would tend to differ from that of Britain and Commonwealth countries.
    Max.