speed of propagation

Discussion in 'Feedback and Suggestions' started by darsie, Jan 3, 2014.

  1. darsie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 19, 2010
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    http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_1/chpt_1/2.html

    "With electricity, the overall effect from one end of a conductor to the other happens at the speed of light: a swift 186,000 miles per second!!!"

    While it does happen at the speed of light, IMHO, it is the speed of light in the conductor, IMHO, which is (considerably) less than the speed of light in vacuum, 186,000 miles per second.
     
  2. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    Actually that approximate figure is for the vacuum of space. In the atmosphere it's affected by the index of refraction, and slowed further by the propagation path ... whether in the air or in a conductor. But, that's only if you wanted to get specific.
     
  3. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    There are quite a few areas where we will not be getting specific. The book is a general reference. For example, Antenna theory covers what you are talking about in depth.
     
  4. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    At least the ebook should state it's "approximately"
     
  5. studiot

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 9, 2007
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    Why should it be the speed of light in the conductior?

    The signal travels along the conductor surface (are you familiar the skin effect?).

    So joejester is right in saying the speed is approximately that of light in vacuuo.
     
  6. BillB3857

    Senior Member

    Feb 28, 2009
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    Haven't any of you ever seen a coiled section of coax used as a delay line?
     
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