Speaker

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by Cerkit, Sep 1, 2010.

  1. Cerkit

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 4, 2009
    275
    3
    Hi. can someone explain how when sending a signal of various frequencies to a speaker , how is it possible for the magnet to resonate at more than one frequency simultaneously??
     
  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Resonance has nothing to do with it. It is responding to the magnetic field created by the current that is a reproduction of the waveforms feed into the speaker.

    The waveforms are complex, and contain many frequencies. But the waveform is also reproduced by the movement of the speaker.
     
  3. Cerkit

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 4, 2009
    275
    3
    Okay, I guess what I don't understand is how the movement of the magnet translates into several sounds, ie we can hear a guitar and drums simultaneously ?
     
  4. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  5. Flow

    Member

    May 30, 2010
    37
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    Well, what's a "frequency"? An oscillation. You can have many oscillations superimposed, or put another way; you can have a signal consisting of multiple frequencies.

    Take a sheet of paper and add sin(x) and sin(2x) together for example, what you get is a signal consisting of two frequencies. You won't necessarily "see" the seperate oscillations in the final signal anymore - what you get in Music is these "chaotic" waveforms seen in a signal analyzer.

    Back to the two sines - the speaker will (ideally) move in the same way as the final signal. What you hear then is (ideally) two oscillations with the given frequency.

    Clear?
     
  6. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    Exactly what Flow said. Your question has the same answer as these: How can I hear music from a simple overlay of sine waves of various frequencies? How can the computer represent the music I hear into one curly, weird looking line?
    The answer is, you don't have to see, hear, or generate the separate sines to get the final result. The signal wich contains them allotgether carries all the information that composes the sound.
     
  7. Cerkit

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 4, 2009
    275
    3
    Awesome guys thanks a lot
     
  8. steveb

    Senior Member

    Jul 3, 2008
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    In a nutshell, it's the principle of linearity and superposition.
     
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