Sound activated lights

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Louie Pollard, Sep 7, 2015.

  1. Louie Pollard

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 7, 2015
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    Hello techy people! I have a dilemma/task for you to help me with:) I dont know much about complex circuitry but I know the basics. So, heres what I want: im building a drum kit & I want to put LED strip lights in each drum & I want the lights to flash when hit. Sounds simple, but theres other things I want... Here are the specifics:
    A box with 4 options & an on off switch, idealy powered by batteries.
    Option 1: the lights in the drums light up when hit & slowly fade
    Option 2: the lights fade up (rather than snaping on) & then fade out like in option 1
    Option 3: lights change colour when hit
    Option 4: a quick flash
    Those are the 4 things I want the lights to do, other things to bare in mind are that I also want The brightness to be controlled by how loud the hit was & I know that a sound activated module is probably the best way to go in terms of triggering the lights
    What my main question is, is:
    How would I do this?
    Can I have a circuit diagram?
    Can I have some amazon links for the components?
    THANKS FOR ANY HELP!
     
  2. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Welcome to the world of microprocessors. You just entered it.
    You will need to choose a microprocessor family, learn to program in the right language, buy the parts to install the program in your chip, learn how to build hardware interfaces, how to make circuit boards, etc. etc. etc.

    I would try PIC because I already speak Basic.
    I've heard an Arduino or a Raspberry Pi are easy to work with.
     
  3. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
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  4. Louie Pollard

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 7, 2015
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    Is there any way I could do it without any programming? I need to keep it cheep!
     
  5. Louie Pollard

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 7, 2015
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  6. blocco a spirale

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 18, 2008
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    This isn't a free design and component sourcing service. Furthermore, based on your question, you would need an enormous amount of support and probably someone to build it for you as well.

    A micro-controller is perhaps the best way to achieve this but first you have to learn how to program one. A micro-controller is also the cheapest way.

    If you follow the non-micro route, consider how to convert the drum impact into an electrical pulse so that you can trigger the lighting effect. Then tackle the circuitry for each of your 4 lighting requirements one at a time. Start with 4, then 1, 2 & 3.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2015
  7. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
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    I edited my post above.
     
  8. ScottWang

    Moderator

    Aug 23, 2012
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    Is this a homework?
     
  9. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    What is your budget? Pick two below for range.

    10£
    30£
    100£
    300£
    1000£
     
  10. Louie Pollard

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 7, 2015
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    Idealy <£15 per drum:)
     
  11. Bernard

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 7, 2008
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    How many drums?
    How many colors?
    Do all drums operate from one controller?
    How many LED's per drum?

    Box # 2: Light will be offset from pulse. acceptable?
    No MP, micro processor, just 555's, OP Amp? & small parts.
    How are you fixed for test equipment?
     
  12. Louie Pollard

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 7, 2015
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    5 drums, 2 led strips per drum & potentially (ideally) 1 controller
     
  13. Bernard

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 7, 2008
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    Post # 6, last paragraph is a good place to start. The following ckt. gives a 10 ms flash per strike. The transducer is based on a 20 mm piezo disc with a small weight ( dead LR44 cell ) glued to center. Output is a 3 V peak to peak trashey damped oscillation. A positive adjustable bias is applied to pin 2 which is set just more + than 1/3 Vcc so a negative going signal will trigger 555. Output is rectified, D2 and lightly filtered, C3, and fed back to pin 2 via D1 to inhibit extraneous following pulses. On breadboard 555 drives only one bright LED, but can drive a power FET which can light many LED's. Drum Pulser 00000.jpg
     
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