Some Cheat Sheets I Designed

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by tom66, Jul 8, 2010.

  1. tom66

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    I designed these 'cheat sheets' at school as part of a project during work experience there. Unfortunately the school didn't end up using them, and I saw the other cheat sheets on here, so I decided to post my set. There are a whopping 17 sheets here, each is an A4 page in full colour PDF vector (except the resistor sheet which was saved as a PNG inside a PDF due to problems with PDF's gradients). I will try and find the original SVG files for these and submit them when I find them.

    They were designed in Inkscape. A great open source program, I recommend you get it if you don't have it yet.

    Bear in mind I was quite a novice when I designed these. I was still learning. So there might be the occasional mistake, you have been warned!

    The following sheets are included:

    • Components Table
    • 555 as an Astable
    • 555 as a Monostable
    • Logic AND/NAND
    • Logic OR/NOR
    • Logic XOR/XNOR
    • Logic Inverter
    • Potential Dividers
    • Frequency
    • Diodes and LEDs
    • Op-amp as a Comparator
    • Rectification/Filtering
    • Resistor Chart
    • Small Component Chart
    • Transistors (BJT only)
    • AC signals
    • Capacitors
    All are attached in two zip files. Unfortunately the total file size of one is 5.1 MB, (just about) too big for this forum.

    I may add more, stay tuned!

    All sheets are Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike-NonCommercial v3.0. See here for more info: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

    Enjoy :),
    Tom
     
  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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  3. tom66

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    I'm considering designing a few more. Any suggestions on what to pick?
     
  4. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
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    I'm a great believer in making stuff like this to help others do things faster. Thanks for the effort!

    I'd recommend you do them in text in Open Office Writer and do the diagrams in Open Office Draw. The tools are good and powerful. Then, when you save the file in PDF form, it should be much smaller than your existing files (which probably just contain images of the original).
     
  5. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    One of my long term projects is to create something that used to be called a cookbook. It is a book of known good circuits, organized in such a way as to be easy to find. I still haven't figured out how to do this in a way where a community can contribute, I've discussed this with the administrators and moderators over a long period of time without any real resolution. The administrator most likely to be able to help is (I hope) on an extended sabbatical, it has been 7 months since we have seen Dave.

    Right now my Blog has my best effort to date. If VBulliten fixed some problems with the albums that would be the best way, since albums allow text to be linked to a picture, but its problem (that makes it unsuitable) is we can not organize the pictures in any organized way. Last in is first shown.

    This leaves the blogs. You can configure them where you are the only one who can make entries, I would recommend this if you want to create a technical reference area.

    One of the huge things I like about the All About Circuits site is they offer everything. The albums section lets you post images (schematics and other), though it is a limit of 800X800 pixels. They have a blogs section, and probably the most relaxed rules in the forums as far as restrictions I've seen anywhere. It adds up to a superior site in every way.

    You have pretty good control over the blogs, and the pixel limit does not exist on attachments, all of which can be linked for elsewhere.

    If you are interested in writing you have an opportunity for the AAC book itself. This text book is not complete, I'm current working on the power supplies section. It isn't often you get to participate on a collaborative effort on a text book. You might even say it is a once in a lifetime opportunity.

    I use Firefox for my browser. If find the real time spell checker extremely convenient, though it is far from perfect. It is still very handy for someone who wants to write online.

    My experimentation still continues. At the moment I've focused my effort on the blogs. I also use the forum to write articles, if you are going to do this be sure to insert blanks entries. One of the other unusual features of this site is the ability to edit your entries forever, although it has been restricted for new users due to some abuse (people deleting their posts after their problem was resolved). Editing to correct mistakes is OK, editing to win an argument is a major abuse, along with deleting posts so someone else can't use your "work". The homework area has this problem to some degree, which has lead to the restrictions (you have met the requirements BTW).

    If you want to see an example of how to write articles using the forum see LEDs, 555s, Flashers, and Light Chasers (forum edition). I actually have 3 of these areas, the first thread was closed because I was still learning and didn't allow room for mods. Even though I though I learned my lesson I had the same problem with the second area (link shown above), which led to the 3rd area in my blog where I put my polished results. Right now there is a definite difference between the forum version and the blog version because I've been working on the article (now and again I add stuff I feel is helpful).

    You can find other such articles in my index, Bill's Index .

    If you go this route have a thick skin. For some reason it attracts some abuse, why I don't know. Mostly the feed back has been positive, and even negative feedback, if done respectfully, is appreciated. I'm not too sure why it triggers a figurative foaming at the mouth response, but it does in some people.
     
  6. tom66

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    I use OpenOffice.org for most of my work. I've pretty much freed myself from Microsoft, who I have a negative opinion of, saying it lightly. I run Ubuntu Linux (10.04) on my laptop and use GPL EDA for circuit design and PCB layout - not the easiest set of tools but by far the most powerful I've found, and it's free.

    However, I've just found Draw isn't really up to standards, for the rest of the OpenOffice.org suite. The graphics only recently became antialiased and there is limited support for complex stuff like combined transforms and complicated strokes. The PDFs are in fact vector except for the resistor chart which is raster because PDF has problems with certain gradients - ugh. I'm more well versed in Inkscape which is a fantastic program. Especially since it's free & open source.

    Bill, I use Firefox too. I also use Chrome occasionally; although the lack of plugins and addons has put me off, I find the increased speed and stability (one tab per process) makes up for it.

    I'm only making posters. I'm not too good at continued writing (like some of the good work on this site), problem being that I tend to make mistakes; I also have really bad handwriting. Posters are art, and I enjoy making them. But I'm going to have to create my library of objects again because I can't find the original SVGs. No problem; I will probably improve my schematic symbols.

    I can upload some of these to the blog on the site or I could put them on my currently unused domain name with the hosting I already have.

    So, any ideas for particular posters, like negative feedback, amplifiers, diodes etc.? Something I know or can research easily? Thanks. :)
     
  7. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
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    Tom, those PDFs you posted seemed to be a bit chunky to me. You didn't say how you made them...

    Re OO: I don't know how OO renders internally, but one way would be to output PostScript for their graphics, then turn that into the PDF. While OO's Draw program certainly isn't as sophisticated as other drawing tools, I've found it adequate to do simple technical stuff, which is all I really need. If I need fancier stuff, I create it in another tool I wrote. I use a fair number of equations in the stuff I write and OO is a good tool for this -- and it's integrated with other common tools, like spreadsheets and generating simple graphs from data. And there's a lot to be said for being able to package it all in a single file that you can hand to someone else.

    Just FYI, the attached PDF is 42k in size and the OO Writer file for it is half that size. That's typical behavior that I've seen, which is why I was a bit surprised at the size of your PDFs.

    Anyway, the size isn't important -- what is important is you taking the time to do the work and donate it for the use of other folks. While you probably will get few thanks for your work (guess how I know :p), you're making things a little better for everyone else.

    --------------------------------------------------------

    Bill, your finding that it's hard to find good ways to collaborate is a well-known problem to a variety of folks, especially those who work on software. If you can figure out ways to mostly generate text files for your content (e.g., HTML or a wiki format), then you might be able to profitably use one of the popular hosted revision control repositories on the web. If you make sure to use one of the modern distributed version control system (DVCS) tools like git, Mercurial, or Bazaar, then you'll find nice tools to help you collaborate with others and benefit from version control -- all the different versions of your work are saved. One way to look at these tools is as an unlimited UNDO button on steroids (and, you can always find the person to blame for a change later on :p).

    I like these hosting sites, as they usually provide you with other good tools, such as issue tracking, a wiki, and messages between the people working on the information content. Three popular sites are github, Bit Bucket, and Launchpad. And they're free, although you can pay to get more storage space and abilities (and there are lots of other hosting sites). But definitely try out their free services -- one may be a good solution for you.

    Lemme give you an example of why these distributed revision control tools are powerful. If I'm part of a project hosted on a website and I have the project's appropriate url, then when I'm at a command prompt (on e.g. Mac, Linux, or Windows), I just type

    Code ( (Unknown Language)):
    1.  xxx clone appropriate_url my_directory
    and, after typing in my password, I have the full project's contents and all of its revision history in my_directory. Here, xxx is the command used for the particular revision control you're using. In fact, the command to do this is the same amongst the three DVCS tools I listed above.

    For folks who break out in hives when they get close to a command line, there are equivalent GUI tools.

    Then, I just work on these files, changing things as I see fit. I can add and delete files, add new directories, etc. When I'm done with my work, I "commit" it (basically telling the DVCS that I want to keep things as they are right now), then put it back on the server with the command

    Code ( (Unknown Language)):
    1.  xxx commit
    Code ( (Unknown Language)):
    1.  xxx push
    It just doesn't get much simpler than this! Of course, there are lots more details, but the overall structure is as I've described it. The major task when you have collaborating workers is that you have to "merge" the contributions from the different workers. This can range from trivial to fiendishly hard; fortunately, most of the time it's pretty easy, even when developers have modified the same lines of a file -- but a human does have to figure out these "conflicts".

    If you want to read some more about this stuff, try the following sites:

    http://hginit.com/ (Start at the second panel unless you're a Subversion user)

    http://hgbook.red-bean.com/ A nice book on Mercurial that's good at explaining the concepts.

    The projects' websites:

    http://bazaar.canonical.com/en/ Bazaar
    http://git-scm.com/ Git
    http://mercurial.selenic.com/ Mercurial

    As to which is best, they all capable tools. git tends to lean toward open source (it was designed by Linux founder Linus Torvalds) and is a bit harder to learn (but it's fast and powerful); Mercurial and Bazaar are similar (both are implemented in python). Mercurial has a bit more traction perhaps, but I like Bazaar's slogan: "Version control for everyone". They all steal good ideas from each other and you can easily be successful with any of them. If I was just working on my own stuff or stuff with other hackers, I'd use git. But because I have to collaborate with others who aren't software engineers or expert computer users, I chose to use Mercurial, which has a very nice GUI for Windows users (TortoiseHg).

    Now, if it hasn't clicked in your head yet, this gives you a free tool for backing up your important files. For example, you Mac, Linux, and cygwin users can just create a directory, populate it with a bunch of hard links to your important files, turn it into a repository, then upload it to one of the hosting sites. Make it private if you've got sensitive information in it (or encrypt the files).

    Windows users can use a big batch file. :p
     
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  8. tom66

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    Well, I'm making a few more posters, and they're <100kB. Inkscape's PDF output has improved significantly and the gradient problem I mentioned with the resistor chart is now gone. It's important to note that the PDFs are vector. You can infinitely zoom. On some of the files you can select text. Also the SVG output can be viewed in some web browsers. There are still some bugs with text output in Firefox and Chrome. I hope this is fixed soon.

    Personally I have more experience with Inkscape and I think it's a more powerful program than OpenOffice.org Draw. But that's my opinion. :)

    someonesdad, many of those websites you talk about only allow you to host files related to the project. Hosting backups is usually not permitted. You could get kicked off.
     
  9. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I like M/S paint. It has some memory limitations, but it is what I draw all my schematics with. I used it and Word97 to draw my DeMolays tee shirts and send it to the printing company with good results. The only thing I really don't like about Paint is its inability to draw to scale. I mean, come on, 96 pixels / inch?

    If you want a copy of all my templates (they don't have to use Paint, any graphics program will do) you can download them on my blogs.

    Introduction and PaintCAD
     
  10. tom66

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    I could never draw with Paint. The inability to modify it after 3 changes would get me. Also, I don't have Paint because I run on Linux, and frankly I haven't found much use for it. You have to have a real steady hand and that is something I do not have. I use a schematic program for that. My PNGs are all rendered to 600 dots per inch which makes them huge.

    Anyway, this is getting off topic. We all use different tools. That's fine.

    I have designed a few more cheat sheets. Please have a look! They are available in PDFs and in the original SVG files. These are only preliminary.

    Any more ideas? I'm thinking about doing opamps.
     
  11. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Like I said, your not stuck with Paint. Have you see The 555 Projects? Check out the bread board drawings. I also documented various bread board layouts so I could do this.

    You're right, the tools don't matter, but you ought to take a look at other folks ideas. Unlike SVG drawing PaintCAD is accessible under any system (including Linux and Mac), and is usable for each with no special software to be installed. This means I can use the templates from literally any computer I get on. None of my drawing can simulate, but I have quite literally drawn well over a thousand schematics here, most embedded inside threads. A few are real bloopers, but I try to own up to them when it happens. :D
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2010
  12. tom66

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    Thanks Bill... have you had a look at my cheat sheet on the LM317? It had a basic breadboard drawing. I drew that in about 5 minutes using a pre-drawn breadboard... it's not the best, I hope to make some better ones later when I draw up a library of components.
     
  13. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Yep, I'd up the output capacitor to 0.1µF (you have 10nF). I have several quick notes in my library, but they are flawed without the capacitors.

    I'm doing a addition to my LEDs, 555s, Flashers, and Light Chasers (forum edition), care to help proof read it? It is still work in progress. I'm currently trying to figure out how to make a LED flicker with one transistor and an AM radio. Simplicity for beginners is the rule. It doesn't help I think I threw away all my old transistor radios (I was going to experiment with some simple RC (remote control) several decades ago). Now I need to get one to test ideas out. :rolleyes: The search continues.

    Talking with you has reminded me I need to upload the latest PaintCAD. It basically encompasses all my drawings of devices, breadboards, and cheat sheets (I think my 555 pages qualify for that). By putting it under a common package people can update easily. I keep a packed folder and just move the updated files in as I make/modify them. One of the things I like about Windows in general is you can have a zip folder and mostly treat it as a conventional folder.

    The guys who made the AAC book are also not fans of M$. They use a graphic program called XCircuit. I haven't gotten the hang of it but it looks very interesting. It is a vector graphic program originally written for Linux, and a Windows version was developed later. My biggest problem is it saves only in it's format, but other than that it appears very useful. I think I was a bit of a shock when someone who only uses an ancient program like Paint came along and could get good results with it.

    If you want to set a nice point to distribute your stuff I'd start a blog here. If you'd asked me if I'd have a blog 3 years ago I'd laughed. Even now mine is a bit of an oddball.
     
  14. tom66

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    I have a domain name, tgohome.com, I might as well use it as it is sitting idle at the moment. But I have a few projects to get done before doing that. I also do web design and programming in my spare time, but I prefer electronics more. :)
     
  15. tom66

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    Would anyone be interested in seeing more posters made? :)
     
  16. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    Surely.

    They are good tools to quickly glance and get an answer.

    Im sure the newer to the world will find great value in them.
     
  17. maxpower097

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2009
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    Good stuff thanks!
     
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