Solve for Xt and Zt

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by js60611, Dec 17, 2009.

  1. js60611

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 12, 2009
    3
    0
    Happy Holidays To All,

    • Here is my prob can't find solution for this exam question and I won't be back in school until 2010. Need to solve for xt and zt, series circuit 120v/60Hz, R1-100ohm, C1-100ohm, L1-150ohm? I am having a brain fart in solving for this I took a shot in the dark to answer and I can't find an example in any notes or book but still looking but thought the masses could help out? I'm sure its easy once i see it so any help would be great or I will not stop thinking about this and I will turn to drinking during the holidays well even more. Thanks and happy holidays all. JS
     
  2. zgozvrm

    Member

    Oct 24, 2009
    115
    2
    Reactance refers to capacitance and inductance. Their values are 180 degrees apart from each other, so the total reactance would be the vector sum of the 2. You will end up with a smaller amount of capacitive reactance, a smaller amount of capacitive reactance, or no reactance at all.

    Impedance is the vector sum of the total reactance and the resistance which is 90 degrees out of phase from both reactances.

    See: http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_2/chpt_5/2.html
     
  3. zgozvrm

    Member

    Oct 24, 2009
    115
    2
    You should be able to answer this particular question without a calculator, or a pencil and paper.
     
  4. Duane P Wetick

    Active Member

    Apr 23, 2009
    408
    19
    Can you find the Zt for a resistance and an inductance in series? If so, just algebraically add the capacitor into the equation and solve.

    Cheers, DPW [ There is no computerized explorer in the world with even a tiny fraction of the power contained in the chemical analog computer known as the human brain, whose reproduction is easily accomplished by unskilled labor.]
     
  5. zgozvrm

    Member

    Oct 24, 2009
    115
    2

    It's easier to add the Zt for the capacitor and the inductor first, since they are 180 degrees apart, then add the resistor.
     
  6. js60611

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 12, 2009
    3
    0
    Thanks zgozvrm and DPW all this was something that we just started to cover so its still new to me every bit if info helps me. zgozvrm thanks for the paper and pencil comment u sound like our first instructor when one person forgot their calc (no not me) and from time to time he would not let us use our calc but do the old fashion way. Hope all had a happy holiday and a great/safe 2010. JS
     
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