Solid state AC relay

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by debe, Mar 1, 2011.

  1. debe

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
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    184
    I have searched some Data archives & cant find these. They are Mitsubishi (solidstate relays) salvaged from a photo copier. SF15DUZ-H1-4 they switch 240V AC on one side & on other side & isolated 4-7V DC will switch it on. Does any one know where a data sheet might be? And could it be used to dim lighting by pulsing it?
     
  2. eblc1388

    Senior Member

    Nov 28, 2008
    1,542
    102
    I have found a data sheet from OMRON instead but the Japanese manufacturer have very strict rules of naming their component so it will be 99% similar.

    The component mark indicates that it has zero-crossing function. As such it is good for switching full AC cycles but can't be used for phase control. Best use on heaters instead of lights.

    The OMROM data sheet is also attached.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Commander#1

    New Member

    Jan 22, 2011
    14
    0
    Hi, Daryl -
    I checked WWW.DATASHEETCATALOG.com and couldn't find anything there, either. So, I left a request with Digikey
    engineers to see what they could find. Since this is a single component request, their warning is " . . it might take
    a little while . . "!?! Hope you have a good book handy.
    As far as dimming a light is concerned -
    ordinarily, no. This is a relay - you turn things on or off with it. But this is a DC/AC relay - the AC load is turned on
    or off by the DC side - meaning - the coupling between each side is by way of an LED/light sensitive TRIAC (an opto-
    coupler!!). Your ordinary wall mounted dimmer switch is just a triac with an adjustible delay for turn on (as far as the
    waveform is concerned). That's why they call it Pulse Width Modulation - so - why not do the same here?! Experiment.
    Pulse the DC input and see what happens. Use an incandescent bulb as a quick load, or even a brushed AC motor -
    just stay within the AC side's parameters. No fluorescent tubes - their ballast circuits will make their terroristic threats
    a reality!! Don't ask me how I know!!!! Use a "zero crossing" detector to sync the DC pulses with the AC line. Be
    VERY Careful!!!! Those are lethal voltages on the AC side!!!

    Phil.
     
  4. debe

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
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    184
    Thanks very mutch for that info & data sheet. Have some others i salvaged from some microwave ovens, they also were either on/off. So i guess they areprobably more reliable than relays, they certainly alot more expensive to buy than relays.
     
  5. Commander#1

    New Member

    Jan 22, 2011
    14
    0
    As a matter of fact, because of the Space Program, relays have gotten extremely reliable and, therefore, it comes
    down to what kind of a deal the design/manufacturing engineer can make with a particular vender. Yah - money!!

    Phil. :)
     
  6. Sodar

    New Member

    Jul 18, 2010
    3
    0
    Debe.... That is a really good photo!! :)
     
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