Soldering prototyping PCB boards?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Grayham, May 28, 2010.

  1. Grayham

    Thread Starter Member

    May 18, 2010
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    I have a prototyping PCB board exacly like this:

    [​IMG]

    I understand I insert the components on the side with no copper plating then solder on the other side that does have the copper.

    My question is how do I solder the for example R1 to R2 in this example:

    [​IMG]


    What material do I use to connect these two PCB holes on the copper side so the two resistors are conducting with eachother?

    Eg, do I use wire or just a large blob of solder to let them conduct?
     
  2. R!f@@

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    u can bend the resistor lead before cutting them and use solder blob
     
  3. spacewrench

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    Oct 5, 2009
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    For individual-pad boards like that, I put leads that are supposed to be connected in adjacent holes, then I hook one lead around the other and solder them together. You can hook a chain of things together like that if you need to.

    I wouldn't trust a big glob of solder to work the way you want -- use wire instead.
     
  4. mcgyvr

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    Oct 15, 2009
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    I use the extra lead wire I just cut off the resistors to join the 2 pads and solder it
     
  5. t06afre

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  6. whale

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    Dec 21, 2008
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    you just make use of medium gauge non insulated copper wire instead of tracks in untracked boards
     
  7. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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    I've got a project I'm working on now that uses those kinds of boards. It looks like this...

    [​IMG]

    I still haven't finished it, but I'm getting close. I'm thinking I'll tweak it after I'm done.

    As you can see, I break it into pieces. I forgot a core lesson on this one, I should have drawn all the power supply traces first. Generally I bend leads over and make the 1st layer interconnects that way. I take any leads I cut off and use them for bare wire stock.

    The second, third, and etc layers are just insulated wires. I use multiple layers to keep confusion down to a minimum, so the wires don't cross.

    The basic templates are in my PaintCad file, I used MS Paint to make the above.

    Bill's Index

    Introduction and PaintCAD

    The advantage to drawing it like this is you can inspect the layout before building, and it makes it a dream to share when you're finished.

    I'm currently looking for some fine gage teflon wire (28 or 30 AWG solid) for interconnects. Teflon insulation does not melt, and makes things easier.

    I use Windows Image and Fax view to print it out (you have to save a copy on your hard drive), the results are very good.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2010
  8. R!f@@

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    hey nice bill
     
  9. Wendy

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    I've done several, including a really primitive SMPS. Takes a while to draw, but nothing beats good planning, except a faulty schematic perhaps.
     
  10. R!f@@

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    you got that right....a hiccup in the ckt will give you migranes
     
  11. Grayham

    Thread Starter Member

    May 18, 2010
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    Yeah looking good Bill.

    But does that mean (looking at the two pins I drew gray lines pointing to) that I would have to put a short piece of wire loading from each other. Wouldn't this be hard since the resistor pin is filling the hole and the wire will no longer fit in?
     
  12. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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    Have you soldered before? I don't mean this as a sarcastic question. Solder fills gaps if both sides are hot. I touch the wire to the pad next to the wire coming through the hole, and apply solder. When it is done right it can be difficult to tell which is which.

    Solder shouldn't be used to force something into position, but it is OK to use it to file the small gaps between two metal surfaces. That is what it is for after all, to fill the gap with a highly conductive and strong alloy.

    The hole is to give the component you are mounting a place to go. You can solder parts onto pads without holes, this is fundamentally what SMT (Surface Mount Technology) is all about. You can also do something similar with conventional components. I have made PCBs without any holes and mounted everything on one side using conventional components.

    Since you bring it up something that should be mentioned is you always leave some strain relief on parts.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2010
  13. Grayham

    Thread Starter Member

    May 18, 2010
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    Yes I have soldered before believe it :) Never on these type of PCB though, mostly pre-made boards.

    My understanding was it is used, yes, to hold in place the component.
    But if you are applying a wire to the same pin, it might compromise the holding of the component because you now have to also hold inplace a wire with the same solder.
     
  14. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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    Actually the small copper pad the solder should also be flowed onto does that (support the parts that is).

    My problem nowdays is I have to use a visor. You asked this on another thread, but a temperature controlled iron with a small tip can save you a lot of heartache. The reason I need the visor is to know when the solder has completely flowed where it is needed.

    You can make two mistakes, too little time and solder, or too much time and solder.

    Too little time and solder results in cold solder that hasn't done its job. A good solder join is shiny, and makes intimate contact with all the metal parts.

    Too much time fries both the PCB material, melts and removes the glue holding the pad on, oxidizes the solder (also resulting in cold solder joints), and if there is too much solder bridges adjacent component pads (which is why I use the visor).

    Sad part is only practice makes perfect. We can tell you how, but you won't really understand until you've had the practice. A lot like welding in that reguard, but having the right tools is important.

    Which brings up another tool, solder wick. If you are rich you have a solder sucker, a hollow tipped soldering iron with a vacuum. Us mere mortals have to use solder braid, which is more attractive to the solder than the surface the solder is on. Just put the braid over the solder to be removed, put the iron over the braid, let it heat and move the braid back and forth to assist in wicking up the liquid solder.

    A fine set of needle nose pliers and especially fine tipped side cutters (to remove excess wire after soldering) are also important.

    A third or fourth had would be nice, but you'll have to figure that one out on your own. :D
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2010
  15. tracecom

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    Apr 16, 2010
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    2 pix = 2k words? :)
     
  16. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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    A good camera doesn't hurt either. :D

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I tend to use a bit more solder on my pads, but that is a matter of preference.

    How to Display Attachments Full Size

    Nice pics, but that should be 72K of pic = 2K of text. :p
     
  17. tracecom

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    Apr 16, 2010
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    I can't afford a visor, so I wear two pairs of readers: +2.00 to see the big parts and a pair of +2.75 over those to see the solder joints. :D

    P.S. It looked better before I had to change out the TO-220 IC's and a few smaller parts, but it works great.
     
  18. Wendy

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    Ain't getting old a bit... bear?

    Seriously, it is very fine work, I think I could have used one when I was 20, but didn't.

    Excellent pictures. What did you use to take the images? Whatever it was, I want one.

    I had to shrink the second one to match the size of the first.
     
  19. tracecom

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    Apr 16, 2010
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    @ Bill

    The camera is an old Sony DSC-S75. It's only 3.3 megapixels, but it has a Carl Zeiss lens and a macro (closeup) setting. When I want the most detail, I take the subject outside and shoot it in light shade (or under high overcast when available.) Then, I usually have to open them up in Photoshop and adjust the levels to brighten them up. These shots were just handheld, but if I put the camera on a tripod and use an electronic shutter release, the pix can be really sharp. Normal format for the DSC-S75 is jpg, but it will record directly in tiff for unbelievable detail. Marketing hype has convinced many people that megapixel count is the only measure of digital photography that matters, but "it ain't so."

    I did notice something odd. SgtWookie always recommends png as the format, so I converted these pix to png before I uploaded them, but the site seems to have converted them back to jpg. :confused:

    Anyway, thanks for the kind words.
     
  20. Grayham

    Thread Starter Member

    May 18, 2010
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    PNG is an uncompressed format and allows the site to use its own jpg compressed instead of having it uploaded as jpg then re-compress it again after a resize to jpg. That's probably why.

    Anyway thanks for the images I will try this later tonight I think.
     
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