Solar Ipod charger

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by KrakenFan, Dec 5, 2008.

  1. KrakenFan

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 1, 2008
    5
    0
    So I ripped the solar panel and the batteries ( 2 600mAh ) out of a solar garden light. I want to take 2 of these and create an Ipod ( usb ) charger. I have looked at a couple of the Ipod charger circuits on instructables.com but am not sure exactly how to go about this. As the batteries are 1.2 volts each for a total of 4.8 volts, will that be enough to charge the ipod? I still need to catch a sunny day to measure the voltage the solar panel supplies so I know what I am working with but was wondering if anyone has any ideas about this project? I would appreciate any ideas that you might have that I would overlook as a newbie or if there is anything you could point me to on the subject that is a relevant read.

    Thanks again,

    KrakenFan
     
  2. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
    9,411
    896
    The ipod has a lithium battery. Lithium is very active and a lithium battery easily catches on fire if it is not charged with the correct current, correct voltage and is not over-charged.
    Use a battery charger IC made for lithium.
     
  3. KrakenFan

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 1, 2008
    5
    0
    Knowledge like that is exactly what I was after! Thanks for the heads up. I notice you are in Canada. I recently ordered $45 of pasts from Digikey and I ended up paying almost $80 for them. Where in Canada can I order from to avoid getting parts from the states? I would really like to find a Canadian supplier for ATTiny chips as well.

    I have an old Ipod that I cannont synch to any longer that will be my first test subject!

    I may not be able to pull this off anyway. I wanted to basically add some solar panels to an existing chargeing circuit design but it might not work.

    Thanks again,

    Glisson
     
  4. KX0Z

    New Member

    Nov 11, 2008
    3
    0


    Are you talking about Lithium Polymer or Lithium Ion. Lithium Polymer batteries are sensitive to charge current and over charging. Lithium Ion batteries, not so much..
     
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