soaps ?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Mathematics!, May 8, 2013.

  1. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
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    Question 1

    I am wondering if one can turn dish washing soaps into hand soaps by just adding a moisturizing agent like glycerin.

    Question 2

    I am wondering what the difference is between dish washing soaps and car soaps / other kinds of soaps... (other then the moisturizing part and the ratio's of sulfates used)

    And weather adding glycerin to them will change them into body/hand based soaps ?(or if there are any other safety issues to be concerned with normally )

    Question 3
    Similar to first 2 questions but for shampoo (hair soap) and body wash (body soap / hand soap )

    By just adding glycerin or a moisturizing agent can you change body wash into shampoo?

    Question 4
    Is there a natural/homemade away to extract the moisturizing agent to go the other way to get dish soap from hand soap ?
     
  2. LDC3

    Active Member

    Apr 27, 2013
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    To put it simply, you can use any soap to get the job done. Although some soaps will work better than others.

    Dish washing soap is aimed at removing grease from dishes. It will have long chain soap molecules to attract the long chain fats. If used as a hand soap, it will easily remove the oil on the skin, which will dry out, even with moisturizers in the soap.

    Hand soap has short chain soap molecules, so the skin oil is not attracted as well, and the moisturizers are also long chain molecules, such as polyethylene glycol.

    I'm not sure about car soaps, but I'm guessing that they have long chain soaps to remove the wax you put on the car and short chain soaps to get the other dirt.

    Shampoo has an additive to give lots of suds. People prefer to have lots of suds to wash their hair.

    As to removing the moisturizer, why bother? It is much easier to buy a soap without them (and probably cheaper).
     
  3. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
    1,022
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    Ya and that is the point how to convert one soap to the other at home just using the most natural ingrediants / processes to do it

    No additive chemical manufactured substance mixes ,...etc or having the manufacture do it ,...etc good old fashion make it the correct way by yourself
     
  4. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
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    Another point is if most home soaps are almost the same apart from the moisturizer agent then why do they cost so much for one brand over the other. It is essentially the same ingredients... they should be essentially the same prices ?

    Same thing for cereals they are essentially the same ingredients for the different brands of the same based cereal ? Do those labels and fancy advertisement really cost that much

    Not a question of price more a question of knowledge :)
     
  5. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Do you know that most fast food restaurants pay around 7¢ / drink, but sell them for $2.50. The food is almost at cost. Buy low, sell high. Someone has to pay the truckers, stock boys, grocery clerks, etc.
     
  6. edwardholmes91

    Member

    Feb 25, 2013
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    I used good old bars of soap, they last for ages and they're usually cheaper than liquid soaps, not to mention they work just as well. It's just reminded me in fact of that Mr Bean episode where he goes to the laundrette and he gets a cheese grater and a bar of soap to make wash powder! :)
     
  7. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    As a young boy I remember both my Mom and Grandma doing that with Ivory bar soap, when washing clothes.:)
     
  8. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    A three legged cast Iron pot, I butchered hog, with fat boiled...stir until

    you got soap. Bath the hog meat before eating in clean water. Bleed and

    gut the hog first. Question-does hog guts make soap @ Shortbus.
     
  9. LDC3

    Active Member

    Apr 27, 2013
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    Actually, you want to boil the fat from the hog with caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) to saponify the fat into fatty acids and glycerol. The solid you get from the process is usable as soap, but it is a little harsh.
     
  10. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    You never know what in the wash, Welcome LDC3 to off topic as you can see we

    talk about anything.
     
  11. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    In the old days they made this by seeping water through wood ashes. Our pioneer ancestors new all the ways to do things we take for granted or use refined chemicals to do today.

    1. every animal that's skin is made into leather, their brain has enough of what it takes to tan it.

    2. cloth that was hand woven was soaked in urine to 'fuller' it. fullering is where the new cloth weave is made both stronger and denser.

    3. urine was also saved and allowed to evaporate to make salt peter (potassium nitrate) to make gun powder. Each family had to supply a certain amount each year to the government.

    There are many more but don't want to bore you.:)
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2013
  12. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    I mourn the loss of so much old information. Perfect example: My mother was born in a cabin that was built in about 1910. In 1975, my grandfather added on a bathroom (Yay, indoor toilet!) By 1985, the termites had eaten the bathroom and left the original cabin untouched. Those people really knew their stuff!
     
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  13. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
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    Ok but interms of hand soaps , dish soaps , laundry cleaners , furniture cleaners ...etc

    Do they all clean at least 99.9% and the really good ones get 99.99% of germs

    if so leaving off the other factors why one would uses one over the other.
    In terms of just cleanness they all pretty much will kill enough germs.
    So if one was to do clothing in the tub... he could uses a body wash or hand soap to do it... and still be confident that it would be pretty clean.... even poop and other gross fluids you could be confident that it was over for those bad germs :)


    If that is correct then one would only be dealing with other factors when choosing a soap such as foaming , fragrance/smell , wrinkle protection, and moisturizer/vitamins/minerals (when it comes to skin/hair).

    And for the smell/fragrance one could just buy different essential oils , for moisturizer (the cooking oils )
    Though the foaming factor right now and how to control it eludes me as well as the wrinkle protection factor
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2013
  14. LDC3

    Active Member

    Apr 27, 2013
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    The way that most people use cleaners, this is wrong. As with anything good, it takes time. Since most people clean by wiping the surface once and expecting to have the job done, I would say they would be lucky if 80% of the germs were killed.

    Bleach is a very efficient killer of germs. If you read the label on the bleach bottle, it will say to leave the bleach on for about 5 minutes. Automatic dishwashers do a great job of killing germs since it uses very hot water and the washing solution is on the dishes for at least 10 minutes.
     
  15. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    #12 likes this.
  16. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Thanks. That kind of explains, "Travelers Diarrhea". The fact of simply moving to a different location and eating different, perfectly healthy foods, can trigger an adaptation to the local biosphere, and it's not a "sickness", it's just a change.
     
  17. shortbus

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    #12 likes this.