SLAC research on no loss, room temp conductor

Discussion in 'Physics' started by RLBurgess, Jun 26, 2009.

  1. RLBurgess

    Thread Starter Member

    May 9, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2009
  2. KL7AJ

    Senior Member

    Nov 4, 2008

    Cool stuff indeed!

    Life is interesting. If I hadn't succumbed to the call of the wild back in 1976, I probably would have ended up at SLAC. All the normal designators were pointing in that direction. In fact, in the Silicon Valley environment of the time, it would have been my "default" move.

    I ended up in ionospheric and Aurora research, which allowed me to be a sourdough and a scientist anyway. :)

    Just finished up a major QST article on X and O mode propagation....and now am ready for a new project. I'm putting together an outline of an article "Putting the Science back into Ham Radio" and want to talk a bit about SLAC's early influence on my pliable young mind. Even understanding as little as I did about particle physics as an 11 year old, something "sproinged" to life in me just being near the place. :)

    I'm actually very encouraged by what I'm seeing in kids now. There's a robotics club in the middle schools here, and they're doing amazing stuff. We need to be hitting kids at an even younger age, though. :)

    Keep up the great work!

  3. Wendy


    Mar 24, 2008
    They say it will be a room temperature superconductor (unless I misread it) that will be severely limited by the current it can conduct.

    Hope I'm reading it right and it is true, any room temperature superconductor is a major breakthrough. The possible upper frequency response is fantastic. Wonder what the upper temperature range is?
  4. DrNick

    Active Member

    Dec 13, 2006
  5. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
    Room temperature superconductors that can carry significant current densities have been the holy grail of superconductor research for many decades. The colored portion is the tough part.
  6. Wendy


    Mar 24, 2008
    Actually, any room temperature superconductor would be a major breakthrough, the second half could come later. Right now you have to use cryogenic temperatures (liquid nitrogen) to make one. Better than liquid helium, but not extremely practical at the moment.

    A room temperature superconductor, even with major limitations on current, would make some fantastic devices. The current number I'm interested in is the upper temperature limit.