Sink, Sank, Sunk ?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by thingmaker3, Jun 10, 2008.

  1. thingmaker3

    Thread Starter Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
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    In the context of thermal dissipation, what is the past tense of "sink?"

    If I put a heatsink on a component right now, I am "heatsinking." If I put it on yesterday, did I "heatsank," or have I "heatsinked?" Is yesterday's component "heatsunken?"

    :confused:
     
  2. Mark44

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 26, 2007
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    My two cents:
    Sink is both a verb--the action of something submerging--and a noun--a thing in the kitchen into which you put water or a thing that is the destination for something, such as heat.

    In the context of heat dissipation, sink and heatsink are nouns, so wouldn't be conjugated.

    OTOH, I don't ordinarily spend much time with people who put heatsinks on components, so I might be missing out on some usage where "heatsink" is used as a verb. Are there people who say "I've overclocked my new processor and I'm going to heatsink it."?
     
  3. RiJoRI

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 15, 2007
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    'Are there people who say "I've overclocked my new processor and I'm going to heatsink it."?'

    Verbing a noun is quite common; the propriety thereof is open to question!

    Informally, I would probably use "heatsinked", unless I was going for (low) humor in which I would use heatsank or heatsunk. Formally, I would use "applied a heatsink."

    FWIW,
    --Rich
     
  4. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
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    That is a good question. But since the word "heatsink" is a noun, it is not correct to say that on object was "heatsank" or "heatsunk", and in a conversation it looks like a fire started inside a ship, and therefore the ship "heatsunk".

    "Heatsinked" is more admissible. "Plug" is a noun too and it is admissible to say that we have "plugged" something into. However, using a noun as a verb is not correct. As RiJoRI said, you are better off saying that you "applied an heatsink".
     
  5. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    More often, usage is like "I put it on a sink/heatsink", or "are you going to sink it?". I don't recall hearing the term used as a verb except in the present tense.
     
  6. recca02

    Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2007
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    "Googled" Heatsank -this was the first result.
    Googled Heatsunk - Seems like some others have used this term.

    Google is a noun turned to verb, I believe one reason we see -ed suffix to nouns to be used as verbs(though informally) might be because there isn't a possible alternative as we have in case of sink to sank.

    Heatsink-ed? Heatsink-fied? :D
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2008
  7. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Heatsinked is good, molten is bad.
     
  8. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    In English, all nouns can be made into verbs. Heatsink (n) as a verb (to heatsink) is apparently a regular verb, i.e, heatsinked. In the second person singular, it would be thou heatsinkest. (See: Wikipedia project on conjugation of verbs).

    That's my take. John
     
  9. Mark44

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 26, 2007
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    And he/she/it heatsinketh, if we're following the King James conjugation.
     
  10. Mark44

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 26, 2007
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    In fact, nouns can be made into other nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc., to your heart's content.

    A book I read several years ago made light of this tendency in some people:
    "We all know the tremendous impactization technology has had on our modern society," he [Dr. King] said. "Impactization?" Chuck said . . . "I thought 'impact' was a verb." "It is," Sarah said. "And once, back in the Late Cretaceous, it was a noun."
    Connie Willis, "In the Late Cretaceous" (1991)​

    It affectualized me so much that I wrote down some of the other gems I found in this book.
    • transformizing
    • innovationary
    • instructionary
    • relevantness
    • ideating
    • datatizing
    • educationing (really!)
    • embarkate
    • reassessmentize
    • initiatory
    • encompassate
     
  11. thingmaker3

    Thread Starter Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
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    Clearly this is a more complex question than I thought it would be. I'll read up on "regular verbs."

    Or would that more properly be "I shalleth readeth uppeth upon mine verbs of most excellent regularity, even unto an understanding most heavenly, heretowith all scales shalleth falleth from mine eyes, verily even though I predicteth such in a sentence most run-on?":D
     
  12. aidafiza

    Member

    Jun 2, 2008
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    LOL!!!i think even Shakespeare will laugh at that..:p
     
  13. RiJoRI

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 15, 2007
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    Oh man, all those words tripped my BS detector big time! E.g., someone using "relevantness" instead of "relevance" indicates either they are prone to group-think and "buzz-wording" :), or they have a poor command of the English language.

    Disenchantificatedly, :eek:
    --Rich
     
  14. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    Sounds like the prez's vocabulary list.
     
  15. thingmaker3

    Thread Starter Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
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    "Initiatory" is a genuine adjective. It describes those things having to do with initiation. I.E. initiatory ritual or initiatory tests. Was the term perhaps used incorrectly in place of "initial?"
     
  16. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
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    Never thought that the prez had a vocabulary list. He is really an humble man since he doesn't show its great knowledge to the world.

    By the way, isn't Sanksunk a Korean vessel manufacturer. I think they manufacture TVs too. :D:D:D
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2008
  17. Mark44

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 26, 2007
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    Yes. And the point the writer was trying to make is that all of the words listed could have been replaced by "real" words that were shorter.
     
  18. thingmaker3

    Thread Starter Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
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    But the shorter real words would not have displayified the intellectuality of the speaker!:D
     
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