Sine wave shape distorts when transformer is connected.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by rocon123, Dec 23, 2015.

  1. rocon123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    27
    0
    Control algorithm contains PI regulator.
    hardware contains H-bridge inverter.
    (1) when resistive load is connected at inverter output terminals, Sine shape retains(which is expected.)
    (2) When i am connecting Transformer to boost current from 0.5A to 5A, sine shape convert to something like bell shape.
    how to overcome this issue?
     
  2. Sensacell

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 19, 2012
    1,129
    266
    Schematics please?
     
  3. rocon123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    27
    0
     
  4. Sensacell

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 19, 2012
    1,129
    266
    What is this mysterious load you are connecting to the output? Do you have details of that too?
    Can't provide any insight until I see the whole picture.
     
  5. rocon123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    27
    0
    I am connecting step down transformer accross capacitor, and at secondary watt hour meter is connected which has resistance in millis.
     
  6. PeterCoxSmith

    Member

    Feb 23, 2015
    148
    38
    Are you controlling to a sinusoidal voltage feedback from vfb1? Is that where you are recording your waveform shapes? It may help to put the screen shots of the waveform on the blog.
     
  7. Sensacell

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 19, 2012
    1,129
    266
    Hmm? this doesn't make any sense?

    You are connecting a transformer with almost a dead short on the secondary?
     
  8. rocon123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    27
    0
    peter,
    no, i am controlling current by giving IFB as feedback. But ultimately it will change output voltage amplitude only to keep desired RMS current.
    I have attatched distorted wave.
     
  9. rocon123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    27
    0
    people connects watt hour meters like that as per me. Is there any thing wrong in such connection? please correct me if i am wrong.
     
  10. PeterCoxSmith

    Member

    Feb 23, 2015
    148
    38
    is that the voltage on the secondary? The distortion could be due to the non-linearity of the transformer if it is at all saturated.
     
  11. rocon123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    27
    0
    peter,
    IFB is current in primary side as can be seen on schematic. I can use that as feedback because after all that is only gets boosted via transformer. Please correct me if i am wrong.
    Transformer saturation limit is 20A. I am checking it with much less current.
     
  12. rocon123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    27
    0
    peter,

    i have attached specifications of transformer i am using for better understanding. i am really in doubt.
     
  13. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,783
    944
    You mentioned your sinewave comes from an inverter with an Hbridge the waveform looks like a good output from such an inverter when loaded. The "flat" spots where the wave changes polarity would indicate a time delay in the Hbridge designed to prevent overlap in the switching fets "on time"
     
  14. rocon123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    27
    0
    are you pointing at deadtime of IGBT?
     
  15. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,783
    944
    Yes.
    Yes I am.
    My crystal ball says you will now post the reasons this cannot be the cause?
     
  16. rocon123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    27
    0
    ya, definitely this can't be the cause because when i am connecting resistor across that filter capacitor, output is not distorted.
     
  17. rocon123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    27
    0
    Can you please help me understanding that transformer specifications? I am not getting saturation limit from that. And that is all i have about transformer...
     
  18. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,783
    944
    There are magnetic fields in your load which must alternate polarity. Current and voltage waves are phase shifted in transformers. Inductors "resist" any change in current flow. Those three things combined can cause what you see on the scope.
    The current flow reverses in the primary BEFORE the magnetic field can follow it. The result is a back EMF created by the inductor which counters the input voltage as it crosses zero
     
    PeterCoxSmith likes this.
  19. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,783
    944
    Transformer secondary #1 has a 10% duty cycle with a 3 minute maximum on time. Is your watt hour meter connected to secondary 1 or 2?
     
  20. PeterCoxSmith

    Member

    Feb 23, 2015
    148
    38
    Distortion on a current waveform is normal, there are a number of potential sources.
    The B/H curve of the iron core is not linear and there can be localised areas of saturation which you can only discover by modelling the magnetic circuit. Kermit2 has pointed out the phase shift issue. The meter, which loads the circuit will have an electronics board with a bridge and a capacitor which also distort the current waveform. I think what you are seeing is normal and not much can be done.

    What is your problem? are you testing meters and worried about accuracy?

    Peter
     
Loading...