Simply Amazing

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by joeyd999, Apr 18, 2013.

  1. joeyd999

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    Jun 6, 2011
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  2. loosewire

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    joey,do some research on the large family ,my thought is the family. What is the

    make up of the family. Who is giving up something for others to advance,do they

    get all the government deductons for all kids and the funds and programs to go with

    it. I don't want the other kids to suffer from there sucess.
     
  3. joeyd999

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    Loose...you suffer from the pie analogy. A pie is a fixed size. If you get a slice, then there is one less slice of pie left for everyone else. You win, someone else must lose.

    Do you really think that these parents, working so hard to raise their children into competent, intelligent human beings cause some other children to be deprived of such?

    Do you think that the presence of the brilliant kids, once they are adults, will lead to an overall poorer world?

    I outright reject your whole premise, and am reluctant to debate it, simply as to not give such ideas credence. But I will say this: these children are home schooled. That means that these parents are not only paying for their childrens' education, but they are *also* paying for other kids to go to public schools that they do not get the benefit of using. Therefore, I submit that this family is burdened more by educational expenses than their neighbors.

    Me and my wife cannot stay home to educate our child, but the last thing I would do is send her to the hamburger mill known as a public school. But I still have to pay, through property taxes, to send my neighbor's kids there, whether I like the results or not.
     
  4. loosewire

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    A dozen kids get all kinds of benefits and grants,home schooling or not,maybe

    some kids don't enough education at home,who knows. We hear about the three

    kids that excel,what about the others. Just trying to bring you to the real world,

    check some background.
     
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  5. joeyd999

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    That's rich!
     
  6. maxpower097

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    I too am not buying the full story. My opinion is their schooling is designed to pass the tests as fast as possible and move to the next grade. Where in traditional school you learn 100% of the data and are tested on 20% of it. Their learning 20% of the data and are being tested on 20% of the data. And once you get past HS and into college it really doesn't matter anymore because the classes are so specialized.
     
  7. #12

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    Quite a feat to figure out out which 20% to teach the kids.
    I think public school is still so inadequate that a smart kid can learn all they teach, and it is easier with home schooling because they aren't distracted by the shenanigans of the other kids that are in the public school.

    Case in point: me. I was so far ahead of the public school curriculum that I never did homework, slept in class, and aced all the tests. The only reason I finished grade school with a "B" average was that the teachers penalized me for never doing homework and that was averaged in with my test scores.
     
  8. loosewire

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    home schooling,teaching the test like max says,it make sense to me.that the school

    work now a days,teach the test,private or public....they could get by....then the

    professors can ride the boat of glory...buying the story....make sure the professor

    make a good show for the writer. I'm not again a good thing.....I just want more fact

    in some story. Put your self with 12 kids. Max has a point,added to my fiance part

    and more of the back ground you will get, free money comes with privacy.

    Wait till your kids are ready college,you will have to make appointments with

    IRS to prove you paid your taxes,go the college and prove you are a citizen.

    You don't get to say..I don't have anything,They don't have record of me.

    Off to college.
     
  9. maxpower097

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    Not really in homeschooling. I've known some homeschooled kids when I was a kid and they would form groups and trade info, tests on kid took last year and give it to another parent with a kid taking it. And just plain learning vs memorization. I fear the kids have learned to memorize more then learn. But who knows may be their just that smart. It just seems fishy to me.
     
  10. #12

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    or may be that the public schools are even less adequate than when I was there.
     
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  11. Georacer

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    I definitely would not want my kids (if I ever have) to go to the university by the age of 12. I 'm with Loosewire on this one.
     
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  12. maxpower097

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    I went to Berkeley Prep so they've always sucked to me.
     
  13. Sparky49

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    Here, we 'often' about hear about some young child who gets to study maths at oxbridge, and I have great respect for them. They must be very clever.

    However, I've never heard any stories about what they went to go on to do after uni.

    And that saddens me.

    Childhood?
     
  14. maxpower097

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    HAHAHAHAH Berkely Preps a HS. Not Berkeley Uni. Its one of the best HS's in the world. I used to goto school with foreign politicians kids and crazy rich people.
     
  15. #12

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    Two edged sword. I only wish my family had the money to free me from the boredom of public school, but one of the the worst parts was arriving at high school 2 years before puberty. "Oh look, it's a miniature nerd." Imagine arriving at University 2 years before puberty!:eek:
     
  16. Sparky49

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    lol, thanks max. :D

    I was referring to the kids in the news story.

    I can refer to you too though. :)

    Sparky
     
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  17. maxpower097

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    I didn't get to finish there my dad ran out on us and had to drop out because of tuition in like 9th grade.
     
  18. strantor

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    Max, you haven't been to public school in quite some time, have you? It is public school that teaches the test.
    You're really off the mark man. Seriously. I wasn't required to take any kind of standardized test until I went to public school for the first time in the 8th grade. The only requirement in Texas is that you maintain a portfolio of you kid's work to prove they are actually doing it and it's not bogus. I checked the law for Florida and it says that home schoolers in Florida have to take their kids annually to a public school and have them evaluated by a state licensed teacher. So for your story to hold water would require the school board to be conspiring with the home schoolers to pass all these kids illegitimately. I guess it's not too far fetched to think that they would help home schoolers cheat when they help their own cheat.

    When I went to school for the first time, I took a placement test and scored at college level in reading & writing, and 9th-10th grade in everything else except math, in which I came in at a 7th grade level. Actually, that's why I went to public school in the first place; my mom only had about an 8th grade level of math and she was more baffled by my work than I was. I simply couldn't teach it to myself, and she couldn't afford a tutor for me. I don't know why they even gave me the placement test, as they had no intention of putting me in 10th grade where I belonged academically; they put me in 8th grade, because that's where all the other kids my age were. So for the rest of my high school career I slept through classes only to score the highest in the class on the tests. Even my senior year seemed to present no new information. Total waste of my time.

    I learned more in homeschool than anybody could ever hope to learn in public school. It's got nothing to do with somehow unfairly acquiring knowledge from other people at their expense (I still not not see any resemblance of logic in that argument) and it damn sure wasn't because I cheated. It's because my instruction was one-on-one. In a class of 30 kids, a teacher can only go as fast as the slowest kid, lest there be a "child left behind." Also, not working individually with the kids, the teachers don't really have an indication as to what the kids are absorbing until test time. In home school, the parent can get instant feedback and know when the child has mastered the concept and move on, no need to stay on the same subject and continue hammering it into the ground for 2 more weeks "just to make sure" that everybody does well on the state test. The public school teachers have no choice but schedule everything in advance and spread the material out over a span that's 10X more time than the brightest student needs. Hell, that time span is probably 2X more than the slowest kid needs too, had that slow kid recieved one-on-one instruction.

    I don't recall exactly, but I don't think that the government paid my parents to home school me, so I'm going to shoot that argument down too. I'm pretty sure that my parents paid the government to teach everybody else's kids, and then taught me themselves on top of that.

    I don't know what you guys are so cynical about. You obviously have no clue what you're talking about, and you're demonizing a really good thing. Having experienced both home school and public school from a student's perspective, I can say that home schooling is best from an academic standpoint. The only place where it is lacking, is the social standpoint. I was socially inept by the time I got to school. I spent a whole year in silence, just learning to interact. It wasn't until I started smoking pot that I really was able to make friends easily. Home schoolers need to be proactive about getting their kids involved in activities with other kids so they don't turn out awkward or delinquent like me. Otherwise, great deal for everybody.

    If my mother had a college education and could have continued home schooling me, I could have gone to college early too; not as early as the kids in the article, but I at least 2-3 years early.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2013
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  19. ErnieM

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    My daughter is a teacher. From what she says not only are the schools less than adequate but so are the students.

    In an art class she literally had to teach 10th graders "portrait" vs "landscape," and from the looks on some faces not everyone believed her.
     
  20. #12

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    It's hard to compete with the fact that there is nothing false on the internet and somebody clicks, "landscape" for them when they want to print a calendar.

    Wait. Bad example. Today's kids don't need to know what day it is. Their smart phone will tell them.
     
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