Simple harmonic oscillator with load

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Mira7, Nov 4, 2013.

  1. Mira7

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2013
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    I tried to construct a harmonic oscillator circuit that is to be loaded with ohmic resistance and integrated in a larger circuit. No oscillation occurred.

    So I created a simple version and try to simulate it in Multisim (schematic attached). This version does not oscillate either (in simulation). Switch operations: S1 is closed, S1 is opened, S2 is closed. I expected and wanted oscillation to occur while S1 is open and S2 is closed until all energy is dissipated.

    What changes can be made to achieve the desired circuit behavior?
     
  2. MikeML

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 2, 2009
    5,450
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    The LC ratio is horrible.

    I suggest you get a real simulator:D

    Here is what it takes to make it sort-of work:

    V(a) and V(b) show when the switches are closed.

    Both V(c) and V(d) exhibit oscillatory behavior.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2013
  3. vk6zgo

    Active Member

    Jul 21, 2012
    677
    85
    I sorely doubt if either version will work in practice.

    The L/C ratio is too high---C1 looks like a short circuit at the frequencies where L2 reactance looks higher than zero.

    The 1.0 resistor is "near as dammit" to a short circuit,too.

    f=1/2π√LC is a nice formula,but you can put in many values of L & C.

    Many combinations give the same value for "f",but some don't work in the real world!
     
  4. LvW

    Active Member

    Jun 13, 2013
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    Mira7, I suggest not to waste your (and our) time for designing/analyzing the shown passive circuit.
    Instead, it is much more economical to describe your requirements and to show us the selected oscillator circuit. More than that, if it does not oscillate describe your observation (e.g. DC output?).
     
  5. Mira7

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2013
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    Ok. I need to dissipate maximum possible energy in a resistive load. The energy should be dissipated in RLOAD as fast as practically possible. Currents should be high as RLOAD will increase with current. I have 250V capacitors available for prototyping.

    You might say that a square wave with short pulses and low duty cycle is much better suited for this purpose. It just seem to require a much more complex circuit, but if you have a suggestion for a square wave version rather than a sinusoidal version, then that would be awesome. I'm using Arduino Uno to control switches and it just does not seem to be fast enough to switch in such a way that low currents are avoided (they occur due to depletion of the energy source). Energy transferred at low currents is mostly wasted. Maybe an analog control circuit or a much faster microcontroller is needed.

    What are your design recommendations?
     
  6. Mira7

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2013
    10
    0
    LC oscillators have turned out to be difficult to get working. For another use case I tried hartley, colpitts and a few other. None of them worked. Eventually I got an astable multivirator working instead.

    Perhaps it is time to focus on a sqare wave solution to my current problem.
     
  7. Mira7

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2013
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    0
    Excellent. I will try it. Which simulator are you using?
     
  8. MikeML

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 2, 2009
    5,450
    1,066
    LTSpice, free download at Linear.com. User's group on Yahoo. Lots of addons there. Here is my .asc file to get you started.
     
  9. vk6zgo

    Active Member

    Jul 21, 2012
    677
    85
    Just for laughs,reduce C1 (in your original circuit) to 1nF & try the simulation again,then try 500pf.
     
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