Simple Harmonic Motion

Discussion in 'Physics' started by logearav, Oct 1, 2011.

  1. logearav

    Thread Starter Member

    Aug 19, 2011
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    (i) vcosθ in a direction parallel to OY.

    (ii) vsinθ in the direction perpendicular to OY.

    The component vsinθ has no effect along vertical diameter YOY' since it is perpendicular to OY.
    Revered members,
    why the perpendicularity of vsinθ to OY makes no effect along vertical diameter?
     
  2. BillO

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 24, 2008
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    Logerave, sorry if this sounds strange, but I have to ask a few questions. From the problems you are presenting you seem to be studying physics at an advanced secondary school level, is this right?

    However, from the questions you are asking, it seems as though you are not yet prepared for this level of study. Is this also right?

    It would be difficult to help you understand the question you are asking in this post, yet at the same time, you really need to know this to answer the questions you have posed in your other posts.

    Orthogonal axis and their mutual independence are essential to understanding these systems, and you should have learned about this in primary school. However, it seems obvious you do not know this.

    It is well beyond what we can do (I can do) on this forum to bring you from knowing the basics about orthogonal systems to understanding simple harmonic motion, where an understanding of calculus and elementary physics is strongly desired.

    What is your current education level?
     
  3. logearav

    Thread Starter Member

    Aug 19, 2011
    248
    0
    Thanks BillO for your constant support in making me understand the concepts. My education level is school final or Higher Secondary First Year (in India). The problem is that i studied in a school which lacked good teachers at primary level. I simply memorised things. Now i put a real effort to understand, though it is bit late, through this forum. I am a learner and i make a sincere attempt to learn things. If this forum feels that making me understand the concepts is difficult, atleast give some links which helps me to understand. Thanks again for the support provided by this forum. I know differential calculus and integral calculus.
     
  4. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  5. logearav

    Thread Starter Member

    Aug 19, 2011
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    BillO,
    Do my question has any relevance to complex variables, that is, cosine -- real part and sine --- imaginary part, going by the equation cosθ+isinθ?
     
  6. BillO

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 24, 2008
    985
    136
    No, in this case they are both real.

    The point of doing this is to take a velocity with a circular path and turn it into functions that describe the horizontal and vertical components of that velocity. One reason to do this is that, in Cartesian coordinates (x, y), a circle is not a function, so you need to decompose it into functions that describe that circle in horizontal (x) and vertical (y) directions.
     
    logearav likes this.
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