Simple Electrical connector nomenclature question.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by William Boune, Feb 27, 2015.

  1. William Boune

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 27, 2015
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    Installing a new ge gas range control panel. With four electrical connectors the old unit is marked: Bake, Broil, NEU and L1. The new unit: Bake, Broil, AD in and Line. Question: Does the old NEU line connect to LINE? Or do I have it backwards? The old NEU line is White (neutral) the old L1 line is RED (Positive).
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Neu is usually neutral (L1 & N) white.
    If it is direct drop in replacement I would assume the AD is the Neu line?
    Not sure of the AD meaning thought.
    Max.
     
  3. William Boune

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 27, 2015
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    Typo AC N, not AD in.
    The original control panel unit L1 line is RED (Hot), the original NEU Line is (white, neutral).
    The new options are AC N (not in) and Line. Which would connect to the new unit's AC N? Which would connect to the new unit's Line?

    My assumption is the NEU (white goes to the AC N and the L1 goes with the Line (RED) in that generally RED or BLACK are line power or hot. Just don't want to blow the new paret
     
  4. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    AC N is Neutral (White) and L1 is the 'Live' conductor (red). 120vac between them.
    I very much doubt that if the part is a direct sub they would have changed the input conductors around in spite of the slightly different notation?.
    Max.
     
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  5. William Boune

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 27, 2015
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    That is clear enough, Line, live and hot are interchangeable terms, correct?

    The old unit had the hot line attached at L1, the new would then go to LINE.

    I was pretty certain I had it figured.

    It is the new "substituted" part, the old one is no longer made.
     
  6. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Yes & yes.
    It is very likely that the unit would still function either way, with Line and N interchanged, it is most usually to signify the preferred side that is switched (live) via any relay or power device.
    Max.
     
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  7. William Boune

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 27, 2015
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    t
    Thanks for making things clear for me, I fixed an appliance and learned a bit. I had it pretty much figured out when I realized I was reading AC N and not AC in (which made me think it was the positive lead, which did not jive with the other Line (which I understood to be Live or hot). Anyhoo, thanks, I had already reassembled it, now I can turn it on to test the results.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2015
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