Shore Power for a boat.

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by mel meinsler, Mar 19, 2015.

  1. mel meinsler

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 19, 2015
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    I would like to add shore power to my boat and install a battery charger to charge the batteries while at the dock. I currently have a bank of two 12v batteries hooked up to a Newmar B1-100 intergrator with a battery switch where by I can use either battery or both to crank the engine. The circuit diagram is at this web site http://jerrylabella.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/battery_integrator.jpg The diagram states that the batteries have to be disconnected from the intergrator in order to prevent damage to the intergrator before the batteries can be charged by an external charger. Does this mean I cannot add shore power and have a charger for the batteries? I would think there must be a way to do this. Anybody have any suggestions??
     
  2. Dodgydave

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 22, 2012
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    i would use a battery isolator switch to disconnect the integrator feed, then you can charge the batteries.
     
  3. mel meinsler

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 19, 2015
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    Thanks so much for your quick reply. Help me understand how to go about this Dave. I suppose I will need two switchs, one for each battery to break the feed from the intergrator? I can see that will electrically disconnect both batteries. What type of charger would be needed? I would think it would have to charge both batteries independently. Also is there a triple pole double throw switch available that I would activate when shore power is hooked up to disconect the batteries and apply the 110v to the charger. If that would work I would think that arrangement would make the setup fail safe? I suppose it would not be a good idea to start the motor with shore power applied.
     
  4. bwilliams60

    Active Member

    Nov 18, 2012
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    You can isolate one battery from the other using a continuous duty magnetic switch of sufficient amperage and size. One battery is hooked up continuously for boat use and the other one is used as a "house" battery and charges only when the motor is running and the alternator is charging. You need to be very careful with marine applications. Everything electrical must be spark arrested and waterproof. I'm sure you already knew that though.
     
  5. Dodgydave

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 22, 2012
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    one suggestion is to use a 110V contactor with contacts rated for high current, to isolate the batteries,so that when the shore power is applied,it disconnects the integrator,

    by the way what is this Integrator,what's it doing,
     
  6. mel meinsler

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 19, 2015
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    Thanks for your reply Dave. As far as explaining what the intergrator does, I copied this from the Newmar web site
    \
    Charging multiple battery banks without use of diode isolators dictates that the batteries be connected or “integrated” only whenever a charge voltage is present so that they may be charged simultaneously, then disconnected or “isolated” when charge voltage is no longer present to allow for selective discharge and avoid having the secondary or standby battery drain into the primary battery.
     
  7. Jan van Eck

    New Member

    Mar 21, 2015
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    People who convert large tour buses into RV buses, and those who service buses used by bands, rock groups, singers (known as "Entertainer coaches" ) all have 110-volt set-ups and the type of heavy-duty equipment you are seeking. There is likely a bus garage near you that can supply you the required parts or point you to industry suppliers.
     
  8. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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  9. mel meinsler

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 19, 2015
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