shocked by ground wire

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by smileycrossbones, Feb 12, 2014.

  1. smileycrossbones

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 12, 2014
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    I'm getting shocked by the ground wire here. I don't understand why the meter shows the same voltage through the hot and the ground as the hot & the neutral. I've never had a situation like this. Any ideas?
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    If you are getting a shock by just touching the ground wire, it would seem it is obviously not at ground potential?
    The fact that the neutral shows a potential to the 'Ground' wire appears to prove this.
    (That avatar threw me for a minute)
    I think I have seen it before? ;)
    Max.
     
  3. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    That's the way it should be.:confused:

    This should be confusing, Max:D
     
  4. djsfantasi

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 11, 2010
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    I agree with you that the ground is not at ground potential. But the OP didn't say there was a potential between ground and neutral. In fact, this info wasn't provided. OP mentioned hot-neutral and hot-ground.

    Smileycrossbones - Can you provide a measurement between ground-neutral?
     
  5. nsaspook

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
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    If this is utility AC wiring contact a qualified electrician asap if you are being shocked by the ground wire.
     
  6. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    If I understand OP that hot to ground and hot to neutral are the same, (and proper) then wiring is correct.

    The shock is from the other source of body contact.
     
  7. t_n_k

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 6, 2009
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    Imitation is the highest form of flattery.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2014
    inwo likes this.
  8. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    smileycrossbones, you need to change your avatar. That one is already taken.
     
  9. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    Don't scare him off.
    I'm not that attached.:D
     
  10. burger2227

    Member

    Feb 3, 2014
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    Change your shoes. I get shocked by my car all of the time when I get out. Its called static electricity.

    BTW, if you get shocked by something, don't try touching it again...
     
  11. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    I always touch the screw on the switch plate before adjusting my programmable thermostat - I killed the previous two with my static personality. It is annoying to feel the blue spark but butter than buying and installing a new thermostat.

    OP,
    The ground and neutral lines are connected in your fusebox. Check and report the third combination (ground to neutral). It should be zero volts.

    Also, is this shock that you get a static blue spark or an invisible jolt that is felt way more than seen?
     
  12. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    What else are you touching to get shocked?

    You will not get a shock from any point of mains power unless touching something else.

    If you are it's static, as suggested.
     
  13. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Not necessarily, if you receive a shock from simply touching a ground conductor that happens to be (incorrectly) live, it can go to earth through the body.
    Max.
     
  14. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    Then the other contact is earth.;):D

    Rare unless wet or barefoot.

    When getting shocked you are immediately aware of the second connection.
     
  15. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    OK. I was going to shout, "Heretic!" but you have first dibs.
     
  16. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    Does that mean AAC is limited to one aviator of Tesla, too?
     
  17. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    Where are you? The USA? As others have mentiond, it may be static electricity; very common this time of year with the furnace driving the humidity inside way down (there's more to It than that, but I digress...)

    As has also been mentioned, ground and neutral are connected together at the service panel, and that is the ONLY place; the ground wire is never supposed to carry current as it is there to protect humans.

    If your dwelling is more than a decade old, there is a fair chance that the ground wire is no longer connected to the grounding rod; which is a copper clad 5/8" rod driven over 8 feet into the ground. Homes in the States built before the 60s might have the ground tide to a copper water pipe; if so you need an upgrade to a ground rod.

    A licensed electrician needs to come out to your place and check it out. If the quote you are given seems high, ask your local mortuary about the cost of your funeral & burial, and I guarantee you'll see the electrician ' quote a bargain by comparison.

    He will have the knowledge, equipment, etc. to take care of it promptly and safely.
     
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