Shadow of an Atom

Discussion in 'Physics' started by SplitInfinity, Apr 20, 2013.

  1. SplitInfinity

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 3, 2013
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    Physicist David Kielpinski of Griffith University isolated a single Ytterbium atom in a vacuum chamber...shined a laser at it and focused in on the resulting 450-Nanometer area of shadow that appeared on his digital image sensor.

    Thus he was able to record an image of the first ever view of an Atomic Shadow.

    Oddly enough...almost 2,500 years ago...Greek Philosopher...Democritus theorized the existance of Atoms by doing very much the same thing Kielpinski has done as the Greek proposed imaging material that one would break down into the very smallest possible units a material could have.

    Split Infinity
     
  2. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    @Split Infinity!
    Are you a copycat? A copycat is a person that copy others stuff from the net, and then publish the material in their own name. So they can appear to smarter and more productive. Take a look here http://discovermagazine.com/2013/jan-feb/73-first-look-at-an-atoms-shadow. This in a strange way almost a word for word copy "your" post above. Not very impressive I would say. If you had have any self-esteem. You had just posted the link with a comment say "very interesting, take a look at this" That would have been OK since you would NOT have taken credit for others work like you did.
    <snip>
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 20, 2013
    DerStrom8 and #12 like this.
  3. SplitInfinity

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 3, 2013
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    Actually I read about this IN Discover Magazine...an actual paper magazine and if I had seen this on the web I would have posted a link for it.

    Let me ask you...when you post about something you had learned about from a book or perhaps from school...do you feel the need to post...Well I have to let everyone know that the electronics I am talking about is something that I read about in a 10 Easy Way's to get a Degree in Engineering Book that I had to purchase in order to learn about such things?

    Perhaps I should post the name of every newspaper or news network that provided me with the information when talking about the Boston Bombing?

    It would have been nice if I had the Discovery Link as there is a very cool picture that goes with the article showing tha actual shadow of the atom.

    Split Infinity
     
  4. SplitInfinity

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 3, 2013
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    Here's some interesting info detailing Kielpinski's work.

    "You cannot see anything smaller than an atom using visible light," Prof Kielpinski said in a statement.
    "We wanted to investigate how few atoms are required to cast a shadow, and we proved it takes just one."
    The scientists used a super high-resolution microscope not available anywhere else in the world.
    A single atom of the element ytterbium was held by electrical forces and exposed to a specific frequency of light, which caused it to cast a shadow that could be photographed.
    Research team member Erik Streed said the photo had myriad implications, including revolutionising quantum computing and biomicroscopy.
    "Because we are able to predict how dark a single atom should be, as in how much light it should absorb in forming a shadow, we can measure if the microscope is achieving the maximum contrast allowed by physics," Dr Streed said.
    "This is important if you want to look at very small and fragile biological samples such as DNA strands where exposure to too much UV light or x-rays will harm the material."


    Read more: http://www.news.com.au/technology/s...ty/story-fn5fsgyc-1226416263078#ixzz2R3tPCsPd


    I find it interesting that they believe nothing smaller than an Atom can be resolved to see such a shadow.

    Split Infinity
     
  5. SplitInfinity

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 3, 2013
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    I think it would be interesting to know or see if by using other Non-Visable Light sources if perhaps a directed laser might be able to create a shadow of a Quantum Particle/Wave Form.

    Now such Quanta are by their nature existing as both particle and wave and the position of Quanta is indeterminate...but perhaps by using a Laser it might be possible to create a Shadow Pattern Field that would be specific to say the Electron Orbital Fields of an Atom or perhaps show us Light Frequency Photon patterns?

    I am not sure about this but it would be interesting to know.

    Split Infinity
     
  6. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    About 10 or more years ago they managed to get a snapshot of a single atom using a laser tuned to the atoms natural frequency. It wasn't very impressive, just a bright dot in the middle of a black screen. What else could you expect? Still, knowing what the picture was was pretty impressive.
     
  7. SplitInfinity

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 3, 2013
    369
    9
    Funny I should come across this but here is a link that talks about how such SHADOWS may have big implications for developing Quantum Computers....curiously...something I am posting about on the Programers Corner Topic.

    Link...http://www.engadget.com/2012/07/05/researchers-capture-a-single-atoms-shadow/

    Split Infinity
     
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