Sequential Logic

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by John Ramelb, Feb 15, 2014.

  1. John Ramelb

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 2, 2014
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    Help me make Sequential Logic in breadboard thanks !
     
  2. Ian Rogers

    Member

    Dec 12, 2012
    158
    29
    Cryptic!!! Ok! You start...
     
  3. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    13,016
    3,235
    Here's a hint. You can start with some flip-flops.
     
    John Ramelb likes this.
  4. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    4,796
    Seriously?

    Just what are you expecting in the way of "help" with a request that is completely devoid of any information?

    I guess if the breadboard is made of out a suitable piece of silicon or other similar material, you could make some sequential logic in it, but I've never heard of it being done. What kind of wafer fab equipment are you planning to use?
     
  5. John Ramelb

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 2, 2014
    26
    0


    Hello btw thank you for your reply in Series and Parallel Circuits you help me alot in that I got pretty good exam result..

    Sorry if I just post this thread, Im confused on our subject in Logic Circuit and Switching Theory.. I just want to know what did you use/reference book in Logic Circuit & Switching Theory cause when my prof teaching I understand but after some day I already forgot, I'm taking notes but not enough time to jot down all the notes I tried to read and understand the Vol. IV- Digital above but it is too broad.. Can you help me please, Reference book only I want to buy and study those topics... Thank you sir/Engr !! Godbless
     
  6. John Ramelb

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 2, 2014
    26
    0
    sorry , Im just confused in Logic Circuit need to study thanks btw
    Godbless
    ..
     
  7. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
    17,748
    4,796
    What I found to be a very good book is Digital Design (or something like that) by John Wakerley (sp?).

    But I think you are headed in the right direction in that the best way to learn this stuff is to get your hands dirty working with it. Build circuits and get them to work. Start out with ultra simple circuits and work your way up. You can either implement circuits that do something "real" or you can make up junk circuits, such as "Make a circuit that turns on a red LED if Switch A is closed but switch B and C is open and turns on a green LED if Switch A is open and Switch B is closed (regardless of the state of switch C)."
     
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