Sequence capturing !

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by R!f@@, Oct 6, 2012.

  1. R!f@@

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    It's about time I did something about this problem. see the attached pic.

    I like to know how I can capture like that.

    With a scope ? :D This I have..
    Spectrum analyzer ? :eek: This I would do any thing to get my hands on :D.

    A computer !? what software ?.

    Any idea ? any one?
     
  2. t06afre

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    I suppose a digital storage scope in single-shot mode can do this. Perhaps with use of some external trigger system
     
  3. JoeJester

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    for the display on the left, select the bottom signal as Ch1 and trigger on channel 1.

    Then you can display the other two on channel 2 of the oscillocope.

    For the t0 to tx presentation on the right, you would need a storage scope as described ... selecting a single sweep and using the top trace as the trigger.
     
  4. R!f@@

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    what ...what ...what ...what ...what ...what ...!
     
  5. t06afre

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    We are just teasing you R!f@@
     
  6. t06afre

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    But well joking aside. Those pictures look like screen dump as a image. From a digital storage scope. As I rember your scope was an anlog scope. Analog scope can not do single sweep or single-shot sweep.
     
  7. R!f@@

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    I know tht.

    Seriously guys..tel me.is there a way to hook up ur computer and do tht fancy stuff.

    I got to learn this u know..too many TV's with the same fault.
     
  8. R!f@@

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    so basically I need a 4 ch digital storage scope
     
  9. crutschow

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    Mar 14, 2008
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    Most analog scopes can do single sweep but you need a (oscilloscope) camera with a time or bulb setting (shutter held open) to capture the image. Of course you must be in the dark or have a light shield tube between the camera and the oscilloscope screen. We commonly did that before digital scopes were invented.

    Yes a 4-channel digital scope will do what the OP wants. For a copy of the results you will need to take a picture of the screen or buy one with a USB output to transfer the image to a computer/printer.
     
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  10. t06afre

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    Sounds complicated if you ask me and quite expensive also:rolleyes:. I guess this perhaps was created using external trigger to synch the camera and the scope. I also remember from school lab. That they had an analog scope. With some kind of "memory" in the screen. But you had to be quick to draw a picture of the screen. Because the picture was quite volatile. The scope trace was gradually eaten up from the corners. We hated that scope I remember
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2012
  11. R!f@@

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    Just what I need .Any DIY thingy ?
     
  12. R!f@@

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    U know what ..I am ordering the MAX17122 evaluation kit so I can study the problem.
     
  13. crutschow

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    The Poloroid film was somewhat expensive but you don't have that cost with today's digital cameras, of course.

    There was no sync. You opened the camera shutter, triggered the scope to do a one-shot, then closed the shutter. You sometimes had to do it a few times to get the exposure correct.

    I've used a CRT storage scopes a few times myself. One example is the old Hughes Memo-Scope. Not near as satisfactory as a modern digital scope.
     
  14. crutschow

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    Certainly a less expensive way to go is a USB digital scope which will display the results on a computer. Depending upon the frequency response needed, you can get inexpensive ones for about $100US.
     
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