sending and receiving an rf signal

Discussion in 'Wireless & RF Design' started by Lakim, Sep 11, 2010.

  1. Lakim

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 10, 2010
    9
    0
    OK, I need to ask another question. Duhhh...
    If I am using a MAXIM max1472 transmitter 300MHz to 450MHz, powered with a 3volt batt.
    I can use a MAXIM max 1470 to receive the signal. But I need more voltage supply to use that receiver than I wanted. Is there a cheaper & lower power alternative to receive the rf signal? The 1470 Receiver is used with key fobs. I just need some way to remotely turn on a small circut. but I don't have much supply voltage to spare, unless I have to.
    Not know exactly what the heck I'm doing goes without saying, so please excuse my ignorence!!! The signal range I am trying to acheive is about 20 to 30 yards. Is there some other way to turn on my circut remotely that I am clueless to???
    If anyone could spare some your time to help me save some of mine, May the good Lord pay you back ten fold! thanx, Lakim.
    ps there was another transmiter from MAXIM also, that I was looking at which was in the same frequency range, but it was adjustable.
     
  2. studiot

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 9, 2007
    5,005
    513
    Good transmission is best facilitated by good antenna design, not additional voltage.
     
  3. Lakim

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 10, 2010
    9
    0
    Yes, I realize that the antenna will help with the recption, but the only reason that I mentioned the voltage issue is that the 1470 receiver is the one that maxim was suggesting to use with that transmitter, and I wanted some way to receive the signal that would use less power than what the 1470 needs. I mean I don't know anything about transmitters or receivers, What I need to know is if there is some other way of just turning on the circut which I could stay in the 1.5 supply volt range on the receiving end, or slightly higher. The transmitter could use up to two 3 volt batteries to send, or doesn't it work that way??? I mean more power on the transmitter to compensate for less power at the receiver? Lakim.
     
  4. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,792
    946
    Check out the 1471 it goes down below 3 volts supply. 2.6 volts min. I think
     
  5. Lakim

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 10, 2010
    9
    0
    I could use that receiver but I have a 3v. supply on the transmitter end and I really need to use as little power on the receiver end as possible like 1.5volts.
    What I would prefer to do is design my own micro circut with a way to build a receiver directly into it instead of purchacing an IC. somthing like an LC receiver. But I am new to all this and still learning. I mean if all I am trying to do here is send out a 300 something MHz frequency and sending it 50 to 100 feet, and have something basic designed into the micro circut, capable of detecting that frequency, then triping the circut on with a transistor, isn't that possible? Does anyone know how I can learn how to design a "basic receiver" with minimal componants without having to puchase a drop in componant? Thanx, Lakim.
     
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