scolastic inverter question

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by ShockBoy, Dec 5, 2009.

  1. ShockBoy

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 27, 2009
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    If I've got 40kw per day which works out to 1667w per day. 69.5w per hour and 1.16w per minute. My question is at what rate does the commercial inverter rate it's wattage on?
     
  2. BillB3857

    Senior Member

    Feb 28, 2009
    2,400
    348
    Don't confuse billed usage with power required. Billed usage is based upon KWH, each of which is the same as using a 1KW load for one hour. The 1KW load is indeed using 1KW at all times it is powered. Obviously, it would cost more to allow it to run for a day than for 1 minute. Inverters, like the ones you plug into an automobile power outlet (once called a cigarette lighter) are rated for their continuous output capability. Most will have a higher intermittent or surge rating, which should only be tapped for very short periods of time.
     
  3. ShockBoy

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 27, 2009
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    I'm trying to calculate watt usage from my bill from S.C.Edison(Demon Monolopy) to choose the correct wattage inverter.
     
  4. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    Your solar cells are too small to power anything. At noon in the middle of summer, the 308 solar cells will produce 539W at only 0.5V. If you connect then in groups of 24 cells in series to make 12V then they can power a little 400W inverter. In winter the solar cells won't do anything.
     
  5. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    It would be rather difficult to calculate your peak power requirements from a power bill.

    You really need something that will collect data from your actual power usage 24 hours/day, for an extended period of time. It's the peak power requirements that you'll have to satisfy. You may be able to better manage your power utilization to reduce the peak power requirements; just simple things like not running the stove, dishwasher, clothes washer and air conditioning all at the same time.
     
  6. ShockBoy

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 27, 2009
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    I'm already on that. Lights off during the day, laundry off-peak, computers set to conserve power, I'm doing what I can. If anyone has plans to pull electricity out of the air could you let me know:)
     
  7. ShockBoy

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 27, 2009
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    I'm in California, near the beach and CA is slowly becomming a desert anyway. Charged batteries DO do something, No?
     
  8. ShockBoy

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 27, 2009
    186
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  9. Duane P Wetick

    Active Member

    Apr 23, 2009
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    Even at the equator, where the sun hits the earth dead-on, you only get 50% of the sunlight maximum in a 24 hour period or in 1 solar year. Subtracting clouds, rainstorms and general gloominess, you probably get less than 40% sun over a year. Consider all these factors in addition to % efficiency conversion,( < 20%) of your solar cells when making a prediction and even then, better multiply your result by 0.666 to get a realistic real world figure to work with.

    Cheers, DPW [ Spent years making heaters out of op-amps.]
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2009
  10. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    You will gain some solar power if you make the solar cells follow the sun across the sky.
    Maybe also follow the sun's elevation in the sky depending on the season.
     
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