SciFi Books

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Wendy, Dec 8, 2009.

  1. Wendy

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I'm an avid SciFi reader. I picked up the bug around 11 or so, and haven't slowed down since. Well, not much. I need sleep nowdays more than then, but at my best I used to polish of 3 novels in a night (and run around half asleep the next day.

    Current scifi has taken an odd turn, I believe it is called military scifi. It already had a venerable tradition, Heinlein's StarShip Troopers comes to mind (and don't prejudge the book from the movie, while one was loosely based on the other, it was only an approximation, and the novel did not mention the gore).

    The current crop tends towards space opera, but that's OK with me. I like the Honor Harrington series myself, though I can see that not being everyone's cup of tea.

    Another current title I would recommend is Von Neuman's War, where some really advanced Von Neuman machines start colonizing the solar system, and they really don't care if the planet's are occupied or not.

    Read any you'd like to share?
     
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    If you like the over-the-top aspect of Mad Max, then Sean McMullen's books are fun. See if you can scare up "Souls in the Great Machine" to get started.

    Larry Niven's "The Mote in God's Eye" is a great first contact novel.

    Kim Stanley Robinson understands science and politics. Try the Mars Trilogy - "Red Mars", "Green Mars", and "Blue Mars".

    You can't beat Niel Stephenson for alternate reality in "Anathem". Or Micheal Chabon's "The Yiddish Policeman's Union".

    Don't like corporations? There is always Peter Watts and "Starfish".
     
  3. RiJoRI

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 15, 2007
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    I went to a used bookstore last Saturday, and thought I'd died and gone to Heaven.

    There was Asimov, Clarke, Heinlein, and Norton.

    I also like S. M. Stirling's work -- Dies the Fire was good; the rest in the series were not as good, from my viewpoint. Also Peshawar Lancers was a good story.

    John Ringo's Posleen War series was also pretty good. (A Hymn Before Battle, Gust Front, When the Devil Dances, & Hell's Faire are the main story. The side stories such as Watch on the Rhine and Yellow Eyes were OK. Sister Time and The Hero were not so hot, IMO)

    I also picked up a couple of E.E. Smith's Lensman books.

    And don't forget Burroughs' Martian Series! Good for buckling the swashes.

    What's really interesting in reading the old books is when you ask, "Why didn't they use radar?" or "Why not plot the course with a computer?" and you realize these concepts did not exist at the time that those books were written!

    In that vein, in one of E.E. Smith's books, there's a line like, "He was a pretty good computer..." which is jarring until you realize that "computer" meant "one who calculates" -- a mathematician.

    --Rich
     
  4. steveb

    Senior Member

    Jul 3, 2008
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    Good topic Bill !

    One I liked as a teenager was "The Gods Themselves" by Asimov. I mention this one because of all the talk we see on this site about free energy and global warming. This book takes both ideas; discovering unlimited energy and inadvertantly risking survival through the use of energy, to the limit.
     
  5. ELECTRONERD

    Senior Member

    May 26, 2009
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    I loved reading The Martian Chronicles and Fareheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. He's one of my favorite authors.

    Austin
     
  6. Paulo540

    Member

    Nov 23, 2009
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    I love anything by Phillip K. Dick, Asimov, William Gibson...

    and of course Burroughs is a fun trip to take sometimes but he wasn't really sci-fi, but maybe more psy-fi lol

    But to be honest I haven't red much of anything fiction-wise since high school (mid-90s).
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2009
  7. steveb

    Senior Member

    Jul 3, 2008
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  8. Wendy

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    The big three when I was growing up was Clark, Heinlein, and Asimov. They are the standards by which I judge all others.

    I'm really enjoying the "Through the Looking Glass" series currently. A physics professor in Florida generates a Boson particle, creating a nuclear sized explosion and generating a bunch of star gates. One of the things on the other side are Dreem, an advanced interstellar race that eats everything, and uses biology as it's technology (with great effect). Fresh meat, anyone? This series reminds me strongly of the Lensman series, and is good fun. The 3rd book just came out, "Claws that catch".

    I like the Polseen series too.
     
  9. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    I think John Ringo has a series a bit like that. The book covers are as lurid as anything that appeared on Thrilling Wonder Stories.

    The guy who came up with the really wild cover art was Frank R. Paul - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_R._Paul
     
  10. Wendy

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    That is another difference, we're seeing more collaborations.

    BTW, I misstated the title, "Into the Looking Glass", by John Ringo and Travis S. Taylor. Travis has written several good ones lately, including the "Von Neuman's War" I mentioned earlier.
     
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