Schmitt Trigger Help

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by sjrobinson, Feb 5, 2014.

  1. sjrobinson

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 1, 2014
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    So redplaya suggested I look into Schmitt Triggers. I think I have the basics figured out but I'm hoping to get a verification on a few things.

    I'm trying to make a switch that would activate a relay when 4.5v or greater is applied to the circuit.

    From what I read it seems that a non-inverting trigger is best for what I need. This would consist of an op-amp (any basic op-amp?) a 1k resistor before the ground, and 10k resistor.

    Its that simple?

    Thanks
     
  2. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    No, it's not that simple. But it could be.

    You are lacking a lot of information.

    Where is the 4.5V coming from?
    What is the part number or specs on the relay?
    What is supplying power to the relay?
     
  3. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,137
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    The basic point you are missing is that a Schmitt Trigger has not just one, but TWO(2) switching thresholds. Given an initial state, the Schmitt Trigger will switch to the opposite state when the input crosses the threshold that is the gratest distance (in voltage) from the initial state. After the output changes state, the switching threshold is changed so that is farther away (in voltage) from the new output state.

    This is a circuit with a digital output and analog inputs. An opamp is normally unsuitable for this application. The good news is that a circuit called a comparator is just the ticket for you.

    Checkout the following:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schmitt_trigger

    Look for the comparator circuits along the right hand side of the page.
     
  4. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    As usual, there are about 6 ways to do this, 12 ways if the only thing you give us is, "4.5 volts". Get real pacific about what you have and what you want and an answer will be tailored to your needs.

    ps, I know how to spell. I'm just having some fun because this guy is from New York and would know how to interpret the joke.
     
  5. sjrobinson

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 1, 2014
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    Sorry, I gotta get used to what to specify and how to word these.

    I did see that comparators could be used as well. Looking up voltage switch gave me a bunch of plans that kinda confused me.

    This is a DC circuit. So basically it would be 4.5 volts coming from a pot controlled 5v source. That would be tee'd into the + voltage wire. So the voltage can be 2 volts or it can be 4 at any given time. Once it reaches that threshold (4.5V+) I would like it to send a current through the 5v SPST relay to switch on another circuit. Ill draw up a quick idea of what I mean...
     
  6. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    You need to answer the question about the current the coil of the relay requires. What is the relay coil resistance?
     
  7. sjrobinson

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 1, 2014
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    Very little current. 5 amps would suffice.
     
  8. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    What do you mean "Very little current"? .5A or 5A is a lot of current for a relay.

    Give us the part number of the relay, please.
     
  9. sjrobinson

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 1, 2014
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    Excuse my ignorance, I'm hoping to learn here. But doesn't a 5v SPST relay work the same regardless of its capacity for 5 amps or .5 right? Isn't it triggered by the voltage?

    I suppose up to this point I'm used to seeing schematics for circuits that work for the particular application even when a few parts are slightly different than the specs. I have a rather large tolerance to work with as this is all experimental.

    Heres a link to a relay that I could use. I see 55 ohms at the coil.
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-pc-Relay-...862?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item23358082a6
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2014
  10. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    You need to know the characteristics of the relay coil, not the contacts.
    If the DC resistance of the coil is 55Ω then it will draw 90mA @5V
    You need this information in order to design your relay coil driver circuit.
     
  11. sjrobinson

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 1, 2014
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    Ok. Thanks.

    So with the information provided, what options do I have for a switch to be activated by a >5 circuit (preferably adjustable)? Or is there anything else I need to provide?

    I'm trying not to break the forum rules... So for this link, I don't want to copy it exactly and don't mean to display this as an automotive mod. But its the best thing I can find.
    http://www.autospeed.com/cms/gallery/article.html?slideshow=0&a=110548&i=12

    I see something as complex as that. It seems like something I would like to build because of the convenience of the pot. But there's also this thing that I can't figure out how to build because of whats labelled K1 FSMR which I assume is a relay. However, I fail to see how it would work since the relay should have at least 4 connections. Otherwise its not doing anything.

    http://www.zen22142.zen.co.uk/Circuits/Switching/vcs555.htm
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2014
  12. MrChips

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    Oct 2, 2009
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    One NPN transistor with 1kΩ resistor in series with the base of the transistor should do it. Connect the emitter to ground and the collector to the relay coil.
     
  13. sjrobinson

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 1, 2014
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    Ok. Thanks for your help. Much appreciated :)
     
  14. sjrobinson

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 1, 2014
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    I just realized... Why wouldn't a relay with a resistor to drop the voltage down to a specific voltage that the relay would switch at work for this?

    I'm trying the NPN transistor and I also tried a schmitt trigger with a 555. Problem is (what I think is called) the hysterisis is too wide of a range (?). Is there a way to narrow it down so that the tolerance is within .5v?

    What I found was that the relay in the circuit would only switch on at 7v but switch off at 4. Thats a 3v gap.
     
  15. MrChips

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    Oct 2, 2009
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    You are conflicting what is known as hysteresis.

    Before we get into that I had asked what power supply is powering the relay? You have not provided that information.

    Mechanical relays have an inherent hysteresis where the latching voltage is much higher than the holding voltage. 7V and 4V respectively is not unusual for that type of relay.

    The hysteresis on the input voltage of an NPN common emitter driver circuit is much different. This is the hysteresis you need to focus on.
     
  16. sjrobinson

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 1, 2014
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    I'm switching between using a 9v battery and 4 AA's to see what voltage works. The NPN Transitor didn't work at all though. I'm not sure if I missed something but the relay was acting a little funny too. I think it may just be the hysteresis of the relay.

    Is there another type of relay with a closer latching and holding voltage? Or a component that I can put in the circuit to help?
     
  17. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    You are bouncing around too many issues all at the same time.
    Focus on one question at a time.
    The relay on the link you have provided indicates that it operates at 5VDC.
    According to the DC resistance measurement you have made, the relay coil would require 100mA @ 5V.
    The relay should work with 4AA's or one 9V. Note that a 9V battery is not designed to supply 100mA for a very long time.
    So your first goal is to get the relay working with a suitable power source.

    The next goal is to place an NPN transistor to function as a switch to turn on the relay. Let's not deviate from this second goal.
     
  18. sjrobinson

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 1, 2014
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    Ok. I understand. It would make sense that the relay does need a certain amount of current.

    Ill try the Transistor circuit again then update.
     
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