Schematic to PCB layout

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by Anthony Quah, Apr 15, 2008.

  1. Anthony Quah

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 1, 2007
    80
    0
    Guys,

    anyone know any software that can help convert a schematic diagram into PCB layout...? please give me the link, i kind of trying to learn the coversion..BUT need confirmation if my PCB layout is correct or not..
     
  2. mik3ca

    Active Member

    Feb 11, 2007
    189
    0
    use cadsoft eagle
     
  3. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
    6
    When using Eagle or similar software, always make the traces manually instead of using the auto-route feature. The auto route might work well enough for low frequency signals, but will cause all manner of noise and crosstalk issues in digital or RF applications.
     
  4. Anthony Quah

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 1, 2007
    80
    0
    i have the same ideal of using Eagle as well....any alternative ?
     
  5. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
    6
    I have not tried KiCad, but many folk seem to like it.
     
  6. jegonz

    Member

    Jan 25, 2008
    19
    0
    If you want you can try PCB123, after you finish the design you can buy online the PCB, and get to your house, so you skip the chemical making part or buying a milling machine!

    http://www.pcb123.com/
     
  7. wijendra14

    New Member

    Apr 13, 2008
    9
    0
    You can use the OrCAD software. This can be downloaded online from PSpice websites. Not too sure about the link though. OrCAD is a widely used software for PCB design.
     
  8. jagjit Sehra

    Member

    Feb 29, 2008
    25
    0
    I use Protel for PCB layout from schematic, it has got an auto route feature and will generate the necassary gerber files.
     
  9. Caveman

    Active Member

    Apr 15, 2008
    471
    0
    Anthony,

    There are tons of packages out there. The costs can vary wildly from free for small boards (like eagle) up to >$20,000 for Allegro. However, they all work basically the same way. You first build your parts into a library. This involves both creating a schematic symbol and a pcb footprint. Sometimes you can find these in the libraries that come with the package, but there always seems to be a couple that aren't there. The next step is to build a schematic. This is where you tell the software what 'nets' connect different pins of the parts to other parts. The software uses this information to create a 'netlist'. You can then create a pcb file from this netlist. Generally, the pcb file will initially show you all of your parts with a bunch of lines between them called a 'ratsnest'. This is how the pcb editor shows you what connects to what (according to your schematic file).

    To confirm if your PCB layout is correct, use DRC (design rules check). You set this up in the layout program, then it will check to make sure no rules are broken. Getting the rules right, that's the hard part...
     
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