Saving the Costa Concordia

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by jimkeith, Jan 18, 2012.

  1. jimkeith

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 26, 2011
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    I have an idea--tell me if you think it has merit.

    The damage appears to be localized and above and/or just below the present keeled over water line. If this is true, could it be patched on site using suitable materials? I also believe that underwater work is also feasible--just a crude patch job that will be essentially water tight.

    Attach perhaps 100 cables that are tied to bedrock and attempt to very slowly rotate the vessel to the point where the starboard gunwale is just above water--this could be done as they are off-loading the vast supply of fuel.

    When the gunwale is above water, start pumping until the ship is essentially afloat, but perhaps still grounded--at the same time start scuttling everything on board that is water damaged and /or portable--this will vastly lighten the ship so its draft will be minimal.

    At this point it may be towable if done with care...

    If nothing else, it may get the ship to a drydock for easier salvage
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2012
  2. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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    I think if the ship were to be salvaged there would be a dark cloud hanging over it, and they would have a hard time booking it.
    And yes, I also think there would be some people standing in line to ride the "death ship" but that wouldn't last long.
     
  3. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    Actually, I've seen film of ships that were salvaged that way before, but they were much, much smaller. I think it's possible, depending on the extent of the damage.
     
  4. jimkeith

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 26, 2011
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    Yes, they can float pretty large vessels with aux floatation systems--would also help here to reduce draft
     
  5. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
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    Many sailboats carry special collision blankets. Rub into something and put a hole in the side, you strap the blanket over the hole and pump out the water.
     
  6. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    Your idea sounds like it might work, but I am not sure how cost effective it would be. There's a reason carfax lists flooding as a hit. You flood electrical systems and they might work for a while but then a year or two later stuff starts going haywire. and we're talking corrosive seawater, not puddle water. If you replaced every cirucuit, every wire, and use only the hull & physical fixtures it might be worthwhile but I would be curious where the breaking point is, as to cost effectiveness the salvage operation plus the removing of all the electronics/electrics (without damaging the ship) compared to starting over from scratch.
     
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  7. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
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    That hull is probably equal to or more valuable than the contents. You certainly would have to gut her.

    But the ship is now tainted. I doubt you would ever be able to sail her as a cruise ship again even if you could refloat her.
     
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  8. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I think you might be surprised. They would rename her certainly, but after it is all said and done people have very short memories.

    There are other good reasons to refloat her though, that several gallons of fuel oil in her tanks, for example.
     
  9. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    I agree. Even if people do remember, I think they will be pragmatic about it . There are ships with dark pasts that still operate as cruise vessels.
     
  10. maxpower097

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2009
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    Nah a ship that big they will have to salvage in pieces. Much of it can be recycled. But actually removing it will be impossible without breaking it into lots of diff\ferent sections.
     
  11. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    ^- it probably will be salvaged in pieces. What some of us were saying was, depending on the extent of the damage, it might be refloated. I think the longer it stays sideways in the water, the less chance there will be of that. I understand the sea is rough there, and it's probably being slowly being beat to death on the rocks.
     
  12. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
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    The owners are considering refloating.

    http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Wrecked+cruise+ship+could+refloated+owners/6002607/story.html

    They have not yet considered cutting her up but have not ruled it out either.


    The hull is more than just metal. it represents a huge number of man hours to build. If it can be repaired and refloated it will.

    But it all depends after they crunch the numbers.
     
  13. maxpower097

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2009
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    I don't think refloating it will work. That ship has taken so much structural damage even if you could refloat it. It would need to be docked immedietely and broken up to rebuild it. I'd bet every load bearing structure on the ship is broken or cracked.
     
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