SAA3018P TV remote chip datasheet.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by ian field, Aug 15, 2013.

  1. ian field

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    Pretty much worn out google looking for the SAA3018P datasheet - it doesn't help that the chip has no makers logo on it. Found a few in the SAA30xx family but not the exact right one.

    Can anyone help?

    Thanks.
     
  2. THE_RB

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    TV remotes normally use a cheap microcontroller as the only chip. They print whatever number they like on it. Occasionally you can even tell which micro brand they are from the pinout and the way the xtal is connected.

    It's very unlikely that you can source a new IC.
     
  3. ian field

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    I don't want to source a new IC - "datasheet" in the title was probably sufficient clue for most people!
     
  4. rogs

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  5. ian field

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    Thanks for the link.

    Siemens & ITT (that I know of) also used SAA prefixes - of the datasheets I found; the SAA3008 at least has the same number of pins,
    it doesn't help that this chip has no makers logo.

    The board has 3 layers of resist: - the first is solder resist, then resist for carbon layer on the button pads and finally a layer for track interconnects - the board has been wet and the final layer has blistered and peeled - taking the interconnects with it, so hand tracing is going to be tricky!

    Some of the chips in the SAA30xx family have upto 20 addresses each of 64 button/codes - having this up and running with selectable jumpers would be one more thing to try when my 8-in-1 universal remote can't find the code.
     
  6. Dodgydave

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  7. ian field

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  8. THE_RB

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    There's no need to be rude! I've worked in TV repair over thirty years and just might be saying something useful. ;)

    The highest likelyhood is that it is a microcontroller. Which means you won't get a datasheet.
     
  9. ian field

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    With an SAA prefix, it could well be a uC - but the SAA3xxx family of remote control chips were very much off the shelf items.

    The difficulty you're implying didn't fully manifest until the early 90's - I even sar one or two 16C84s in pattern replacement handsets.
     
  10. THE_RB

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    Yep, some "off the shelf" numbered ICs in TVs are micros anyway. Manufacturers would have their own marked numbers on programmed micros, and even have them available from suppliers that sell to the TV repair industry. Sometimes they use the same micro, with different marked numbers to show different firmware was inside.
     
  11. ian field

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    The SAA3xxx are not all the same chip with arbitrary firmware - I have several datasheets upto SAA3010 - the SAA3018 datasheet remains elusive.

    Most of the remote controller chip manufacturers I encountered in my years in the trade, stamped their logo loud & proud (except ITT - theirs frequently rubbed off).

    With the SAA prefix I was thinking Siemens - but I've never heard of them not stamping their logo.
     
  12. THE_RB

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    I assumed you were not an expert? If you have "years in the trade" why can't you fix the remote? :eek:

    They almost universally have matrixed keypads on X number of pins, IR LED driven from one pin via a transistor, and 2 power pins and 2 xtal pins. That's ALL the pins.

    Having an IC datasheet won't help you much at all, because decoding the remote circuit would need a schematic for that remote itself showing which button connects to which pin/matrix.

    Or, if you wanted to rely on the datasheet to work out which pins are matrix row and which are matrix column, that always pretty obvious to an "expert" looking at the PCB wiring.

    And if the PCB is so badly damaged that you can't see any info at all on what is matrix row and column then the IC datasheet won't be of any use anyway.
     
  13. ian field

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    I assumed you could read - I've already stated that the PCB with 3 layers of resist has been wet, blistered and peeled, the top layer of resist insulates track-bridging overlay, which is now gone - making it impossible to trace the circuit.

    There's not much hope of repairing the remote as some of the tracks are corroded through, my interest in this chip (which I am repeating just for you) is that some of the chips in the SAA3xxx family are capable of over 2000 codes in upto 20 code set addresses, one more thing to try when the universal remote doesn't find the device I'm scanning for.

    HTH.
     
  14. THE_RB

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    You really are rude. How is that working out for you?

    With all your expertise I'm sure you can fix your own problems from now on, you sure won't be getting any more help from me.
     
  15. ian field

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    What help was that then?!

    At best you've been patronising - and possibly what little information you offered was just plain wrong, but as I have not been able to find the correct info I can't prove that.
     
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