RGB LED audio project (dummy needs help)

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by bigbossman, Feb 3, 2011.

  1. bigbossman

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 3, 2011
    3
    0
    Alright, here is something I call newbie in over his head...

    So I have purchased an off the shelf RGB led controller with an audio trigger input, power supply, and a couple of rigid rgb strips and got a working lighting system that reacts to sound. (all from superbrightleds) It was a piece of cake!

    What I am trying to do is swap out the strips and drive individual 6 pin prolightopto rgb leds (1 watt). My goal is to run 40 rgb leds using the RGB controller, 2 50 watt power supplies and a rgb amplifier to help with the large amount of leds. I thought I would just be able to wire them up and hook up directly to the rgb+v connections and it would work... But after many hours of reading here on the site I realized I need some serious help to complete the project...

    A couple of questions I hope to get answered are:
    1. How to wire the 6 pin led? The controller is set for common anode strips but I am not sure how to connect it to the 6 pin leds.
    2. Should I be running these leds in a series or parallel circuit, and how do I wire that up??
    3. Do I need to add resistors to this circuit or does the controller take care of it?
    4. Is there any other advice I am in need of??


    Thanks in advance for anyone who can help me!

    Here is a link to the datasheets of the equipment I have purchased.

    RGB Controller.
    http://www.superbrightleds.com/cgi-...ion=DispPage&Page2Disp=/specs/LDRF-RGB4-A.htm

    LED's:
    http://www.superbrightleds.com/pdfs/1W_PM6B-1LFx_v1 0.pdf

    Power Supply Data:
    dc output 12v, output rated current 4.1A (4170ma)
    Output current range 0-4.1A DC output power 50w
     
  2. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
    2,803
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  3. bigbossman

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 3, 2011
    3
    0
    Thank you! I was not sure if an individual led would wire the same at their led bars, and the whole 6 pin thing threw me off...

    Any Idea on if I should be adding resistors to my circuit? The RGB bars supplied by them had some soldered into the bar, but then again they are using 5mm leds...
     
  4. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
    9,411
    896
    If you do not limit the current in the LEDs with a resistor or a constant current source then the LEDs will blow up and make a lot of smoke.

    I think you should find out what is the forward voltages of the colours and connect two or three of the same colour in series and in series with a current-limiting resistor. Then the power will light LEDs instead of heating a huge resistor.
     
  5. bigbossman

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 3, 2011
    3
    0
    Well I'm getting more lost yet hopefully closer to warming up the solder gun.

    I am right in thinking if I get a good constant current power supply I'd be alright?

    Second- This may sound stupid but what is my rgb driver actually doing?? Changing voltage or current to transistion the LEDs??

    I looked at the data on my LEDs and found this: Fvolt R2.2 G3.5 B3.5. FCurrent 150 peak pulse 250 ma.

    I have been trying, in my spare time, to bring this idea to life for 7+ years... I think thanks to this forum I can finally see the light at the end of the tunnel!
     
  6. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
    9,411
    896
    You don't want a single constant current power supply. You need a constant current circuit in series with each string of LEDs and you will need many of them.

    With a 12V supply then you can connect four red 2.2V leds in series that use 8.8V and in series with a constant current source that limits the current to 100mA or whatever amount you have cooling for the LEDs. The constant current source must have a dropout voltage of at least (12 - 8.8=) 3.2V.

    Only two green or blue LEDs can be in series and in series with a constant current source.

    We don't know if your LED driver dims and brightens the LEDs or if it simply turns them on and off.
     
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