Resistance and Conductance formula

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by Dorrance, Sep 8, 2012.

  1. Dorrance

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 19, 2011
    18
    0
    I am a student a Devry and I am having a lot of trouble understanding this formula. I need to get conductance from resistance and vice versa. I have the formulas but do not understand them.
    I know that C=1/R and R=1/C
    I found the answers for the problems but would really like to understand them.
    If someone could help me I would like answers for kΩ & mΩ more the formula simplified.
     
  2. StayatHomeElectronics

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 25, 2008
    864
    40
    Conductance, often written as G, is a measure of how well a material conducts current. The higher the value, the easier it is for current to flow.

    Resistance is a measure of how much a material resists, or restricts, the flow of current. High values of resistance means the current does not flow easily through the material, the current will be smaller.

    Therefore, your equation G = 1/R basically pits these two ideas together. A large material resistance resists the flow of current in the material. From your equation, the conductance would also be low.

    Not quite sure what you are asking for on the ohms. 1 kOhms = 1000 Ohms, 1 mOhm = 0.001 Ohms.

    Units for resistance, R, is Ohms. Units for conductance, G, is Siemens (S). Siemens = 1 / Ohms.
     
  3. Dorrance

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 19, 2011
    18
    0
    Sorry for the confusion my problem is I do the math and it doesn't work out? I know the formula is correct and I am doing something wrong. 108,342,000Ω is one of my problems I think the answer is 9.23µS still unsure. I am not looking for answers I think it would help if someone could solve this in long form and let me ask questions about it.
     
  4. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,794
    948
    What's the problem here.

    YOU understand it is a reciprocal function, right?

    Open up the calculator on the Windows computer you are most likely using and enter a '1', press the 'divide' key and then enter the number of ohms. Press "="

    You must be seeking something else. This is too simple.
     
  5. StayatHomeElectronics

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 25, 2008
    864
    40
    You seem to have left the last three zero off of the calculation. You have shown your answer in microvolts instead of nanovolts. Microvolts are 0.000001 volts (10E-6) and nanovolts are 0.000000001 volts (10e-9).

    Edit: That should be microSiemens and nanoSiemans instead of volts.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012
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