Regenerative car

Discussion in 'General Science' started by amilton542, Apr 6, 2011.

  1. amilton542

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 13, 2010
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    I was watching television a few days ago about turbines on a river bed where the rotor was geared to rotate at a higher speed to the turbine blades, it came to my attention that maybe a design could be made possible for a car. In it's simplest form if you have a battery to provide the power to pull off, mount a generator for each wheel at the back with the rotor geared to rotate faster than the wheels, step up what you generate again and again for smaller cable sizes and you feed a motor for each wheel at the front equilibrium may be achieved. Cool air blowing over the motors will bring the resistance down so they can work harder, the faster you go the cooler the motors. Replenish the battery using regenerative braking and inductor or capacitor banks that discharge at the traffic lights to pull off again and superconductivity research may develop further to make a more effecient design. YES output will always be greater than input but what if you designed the car that does not require charging as frequently as the conventional electric car.

    It does you good to be imaginative :p
     
  2. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    ANY power generated will always be less than the power required to generate it. Hysterisis, Eddy currents, magnetic field leakage, AND heat are all created whenever you generate electricity with a motor/generator. The power comes from the car motor.

    If you get less power out of the generator than you require to generate it...HOW? can you expect the car to benefit from this?

    Think hard and try to see it. :)
     
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  3. Adjuster

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 26, 2010
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    Regenerative braking is already usefully applied to some electric vehicles, so that some energy can be stored for later use whenever the vehicle is braked.

    It is not helpful however to have a number of motors and generators all working at the same time: continually circulating energy in this way must always increase losses. The idea is to engage the generator (or generator function of the driving motor, if only a single machine is used) only during deceleration.
     
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  4. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I suspect the OP is talking efficiencies, not overunity. Most hybrids already do this with excellent results. Trains do it even more with better results.
     
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  5. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    Well, to be honest, he did say 'equilibrium' and not over unity. ;)
     
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  6. amilton542

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 13, 2010
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    What do we use as transport when the extinction of fossil fuels arrive?
    They tell us we must reduce our carbon footprint, but the global population "fillin up" a battery powered car requires more power stations, you do not get something for nothing. One day we will depend on electric travel, and a lorry/truck for example that will deliver food and water will consume huge amounts of power and the conventional battery powered design won't meet this demand.
     
  7. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    The term fossil fuels is fairly arbitrary. Biofuels are basically the same things, just less old.
     
  8. Heavydoody

    Active Member

    Jul 31, 2009
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    Google KERS sometime. Some of these were purely mechanical. I haven't watched f1 recently, so I don't know if they are still using them, but when a car came out of a turn and the driver pushed that button you could definitely see the release of energy that was stored up. Well, provided there was a car without KERS there to overtake :)
     
  9. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    They still use it in F1 but it is a horrible crippled system. The regulations limit the power and the amount of time it can be used per lap and as a result not much power needs recovering so it is taken from the rear axle while braking. If the teams were allowed to use as much as they wanted we could see some real innovation.
     
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