Rechargeable Wireless Speakers, boosted?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by IowanChef, May 14, 2010.

  1. IowanChef

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Mar 6, 2010
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    0
    So I managed to have three of these Brookstone rechargeable wireless "Podz" speakers, complete with transmitter, fall into my lap at a price too good to turn down ($2). They work fine, I suppose, and they're certainly stylish, being the sucker I am for anything round. Make it blinky AND clear, and you'll be fighting me for it. Anyway, there's an occasional popping crackle glitch that comes from the speakers every so often, and it sounds like it's of the interference variety. I've got a wireless router going, but I'm pretty sure these speakers are running at 9mhz, which I believe is far from my router's 2ghz range (guessing).

    My question is, are these things worth keeping if it's perhaps just an issue of weird power surges, due to the crappy vac-sealed rechargeable battery packs inside being nearly-dead? Do I just pop a big cap over every speaker's power supply and see if that does the trick? Or, might I be able to modify the transmitter and receivers to communicate clearer?

    Yet another weird request for the sages. Thank you for guiding this wayward fool..
     
  2. IowanChef

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Mar 6, 2010
    34
    0
    I suppose I'll go ahead and guess that this project is not worth the trouble? I've been thinking more about the situation, and I'm wondering if the glitch pop I'm hearing is a result of the battery packs being old as hell and if that's being compounded by the circuitry attached to these packs. Two things, both related to the charging of said batteries, one tiny relay-looking rectangular box, and another tinier blue blob thing, a varistor, of sorts?

    Anyway, that's all. I guess they'll sit and just be happy round dead things until I'm smart enough to know what to do with them. To the pile!
     
  3. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
    9,411
    896
    It takes a complicated and expensive radio circuit to produce low noise stereo audio.
    Those speakers sound like they are very cheap so of course they will have interference.
     
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