Realizing Transfer Functions by Op-amp

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by endaya_walatch, Dec 6, 2009.

  1. endaya_walatch

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 13, 2009
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    0
    can you help me to configure these transfer functions??
    please help me..
    thanks..
     
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  2. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    This certainly looks like a homework assignment.

    Is it?
     
  3. steveb

    Senior Member

    Jul 3, 2008
    2,433
    469
    I find this question a little vague. Do you know what v, z and x are supposed to represent? Are they fixed constants, or do they represent variable gains that must be independently controlled in a circuit? If they are variable, what controls them? Do they represent variable resistor controls?
     
  4. endaya_walatch

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 13, 2009
    33
    0
    the variables are said to be functions..that's why I'm getting trouble to understand it..
     
  5. steveb

    Senior Member

    Jul 3, 2008
    2,433
    469
    Seems confusing to me. Maybe someone else has a more definite idea of what those functions mean. My best guess is that the are independent gain functions. An example could be a variable gain implemented by turning a variable resistor over an angular range. The angle is the independent variable, and the function, e.g. v(angle), is the gain that will result.

    You would have to draw your circuit in a general way with resistor specified as gain factors times a fundamental resistor value. For example; resistors R and vR resistors can be used with an inverting opamp amplifier to give a gain of

    Vout/Vin=-v

    Your first formula amounts to multiplying by 6v, so you could use resistor values of R and 6vR on and inverting amplifier and follow this with another inverting amplifier with a gain of -1. The second circuit is more involved, but the same method can be used. For example an inverting summing amplifier combined with two inverting amplifiers - one on each of the inputs that need positive gain.
     
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