RC circuit function in clock signal side

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by pujulde, Aug 12, 2016.

  1. pujulde

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 24, 2013
    95
    1
    Hi everyone, can you help me to understand the exact designation of this circuit. The clock signal can be 125kHz or 250kHz and its apllyed to the circuit which is given below. The capacitor which is connected in shunt mode can short the high frequency signals. What is the use of this capacitor? pujulde_20160812_102504_reduced.jpg

    Moderators note: cut away unused space, rotated and scaled image (I am not going to rotate my monitor to view it)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 12, 2016
  2. AlbertHall

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 4, 2014
    1,951
    387
    Where is this circuit from?
    The capacitors can't short the clock, they just connect 100 Ohms to chassis.
    What is the relationship between the clock signal lines and the chassis connection?
     
  3. pujulde

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 24, 2013
    95
    1
    As i see understand this signal is only for driving the transistor. The relationship between chasis and output i dont know. Capacitor cannot short because of what? Ok its not a low pass filter but anyway if it was without capacitor what difference could be ?
     
  4. AlbertHall

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 4, 2014
    1,951
    387
    I now get an error trying to view your attachment.
    Last time I looked, from each clock input there was a capacitor in series with 100 Ohm resistor to chassis. That 100 Ohms is the minimum possible impedance that series combination can be.
    Those capacitors and resistors establish a possible current path from the clock inputs to chassis. How much current flows through those paths (and hence what effect they have) depends on the relationship between the clock source and the chassis connection.
     
    pujulde likes this.
  5. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
    5,696
    904
    @AlbertHall
    A moderator modified the image. The old image may be cached in your PC.
     
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