Rapid Cooler

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by 4beowulf7, Jul 26, 2015.

  1. 4beowulf7

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 25, 2015
    20
    5
    Hello everyone!
    I was thinking on the problem of Rapid Cooling and I like to share my findings with you.
    Greetings
     
  2. tcmtech

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 4, 2013
    2,029
    1,616
    No.
     
  3. Lestraveled

    Well-Known Member

    May 19, 2014
    1,957
    1,215
    +1 on the NO.
     
  4. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
    2,375
    998
    You need so show the math that proves your theory.
     
  5. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,246
    6,738
    Not a chance.
    State certified to design heating and cooling equipment up to 1/2 million BTUs per hour since 1985.

    Simply put, you can't destroy heat, you move it. If loading a lot of electrons on a capacitor made it hot, cooling the capacitor and then removing a lot of electrons would make it cooler than it was in the first place. If this had any chance of working, some air conditioners or refrigerators would have been made out of capacitors sometime in the last century. This concept was not overlooked, it was eliminated because it won't work.
     
    JoeJester and killivolt like this.
  6. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
    2,375
    998
    Actually, such a device exists, though it doesn't use or require high voltage, nor does it use kinectic energy of free electrons. But is does use nothing more than a DC current and semiconductor junctions.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermoelectric_cooling

    Theoretically, a surface with free electrons can cool via radiation. If there was a way to enhance this mode of cooling, then you might have something....
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2015
  7. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,246
    6,738
    I feel it is appropriate to mention that a Peltier device is not a capacitor and does not operate on the principle of reversing the polarity of the charge to remove heat laden electrons.
     
  8. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
    2,375
    998
    Course, I already pointed those things out in my post. It does however use electron drift to cool. Whether or not electrons can carry the heat that they absorb is above my pay grade.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2015
  9. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,083
    3,021
    Another NO vote.
     
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