Raindrops keep falling through my differential equation

Discussion in 'Math' started by Drawoh, Aug 21, 2008.

  1. Drawoh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 21, 2008
    1
    0
    Greetings,

    given a laser beam of 0.5 mm in diameter, hitting a light sensitive target at 10 meters which will register a pulse as small as 1 uSec, what would the differential equation (*) for the number of times per second the beam will be cut during a normal rainstorm?

    *) I assume it would be a diff.eq, but am near clueless how to approach this.

    "Raindrops range from 1/100 inch (.0254 centimeter) to 1/4 inch (.635 centimeter) in diameter... Not including wind-driven rain, raindrops fall between 7 and 18 miles per hour (3 and 8 meters per second) in still air. The range in speed depends on the the size of the raindrop. Air friction breaks up raindrops when they exceed 18 miles per hour. "


    thanks much for any suggestions,
    Howard
    ________________________________
    references:
    http://www.weatherwizkids.com/Rain.htm
    http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/raindropshape.html
     
  2. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
    6
    Why would it be a differential equation? Wouldn't one just use drops per square meter per second and plug into an algebraic expression?
     
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