R.M.S

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by zaidqais, Apr 17, 2009.

  1. zaidqais

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 14, 2009
    16
    0
    Hi
    can i found the R.M.S of the the function

    Code ( (Unknown Language)):
    1. 10sin(wt)+20
    by divide it by the root of 2 ?

    Thank you
     
  2. PRS

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 24, 2008
    989
    35
    If the peak voltage is 10v then the rms voltage is 10/sqrt(2). You're right. The function still has the same frequency and phase angle.
     
  3. SawabyPlus

    Member

    Feb 27, 2009
    14
    0
    The r.m.s. of any function of DC and harmonics is given by the formula
    X r.m.s = sqrt(x0^2 + x1^2/2 + x2^2/2 + ... )
    where :
    x0 is the DC value.
    x1,x2,.. are the amplitude of the harmonics.

    so the answer to ur question is
    X r.m.s = sqrt( 20^2 + 10^2/2) = 21.213

    this can be driven from the definition of the r.m.s.
     
  4. zaidqais

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 14, 2009
    16
    0
    First thank you all for your help :)
    it was very helpful
     
  5. PRS

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 24, 2008
    989
    35
    I see that sawabyplus understood the function to have a dc value. I assumed that you had put the second parenthesis in the wrong place so that we have
    10sin(wt+20) volts or amps, whatever -- you didn't specify.

    If sawabyplus is right in assuming V = 20 + 10sin(wt), then we need the value of omega and t to solve for the instantaneous rms voltage. You did not provide this information so we cannot compute the rms voltage as it varies sinusoidally.

    However, if my hunch is right, then we can write V = 7.07sin(wt + 20)
     
  6. SawabyPlus

    Member

    Feb 27, 2009
    14
    0
    you are right PRS, it might have been a mistake.
    but what's meant by the instantaneous rms value ?, isn't the root mean square a constant that describes the function better than the simple average in average power calculations? what would be the idea behind mean if instantaneous?
    and the most important, when to use that instantaneous expression? and what is physics behind it?
     
  7. zaidqais

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 14, 2009
    16
    0
    things are mixed up a little bit with me :)

    if my function was

    Code ( (Unknown Language)):
    1. 10sin(wt+30)+20
    R.M.S = 21.213 and σ =30 degree ?
     
  8. PRS

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 24, 2008
    989
    35
    Sawabyplus, instantaneous value of the voltage was meant, not instantaneous rms value. You're right the latter makes no sense.
     
  9. PRS

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 24, 2008
    989
    35
    zaidquis, dc voltage is constant, not changing. I may be wrong but I think that only sinewaves are expressed as rms voltages or currents.
     
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