Quick question before I start to solder...

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by thakid87, Nov 6, 2010.

  1. thakid87

    Thread Starter Active Member

    May 23, 2009
    122
    0
    I have the board in the pictures attached with the components mounted on the non plated side so I can solder on the plated side. This is the correct way to use these, correct?

    Can I solder on the other side? My soldering skills are not so great and I would like to avoid creating shorts between the pads if my joints are too thick/wide.

    Thanks.
     
  2. DigitalReaper

    Member

    Aug 7, 2010
    70
    2
    That is correct, yes. Two observations though:

    You should change those 2 header pins to 3, pull the middle one out of the plastic strip if it's a problem. It'll help keep the pins lined up when you're soldering them.

    I only see one capacitor on the board, you need one on the 7805s output for stability and one on the input if the power is coming a long way (e.g. from a wall wart). You can find more info in the datasheet, http://pdf1.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/view/22640/STMICROELECTRONICS/L7812CV.html (the 7812 is just the same as a 7805 except for the output voltage)
     
  3. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,792
    948
    running your connections on the top side as much as possible is my preference. It keeps the bottom side(solder) neater and trim. for signal connection both wire and component leg share the same hole. for power connections if larger gauge wire is used the wire is installed one hole away and the leg of the component is bent and trimmed to meet on the solder side...use solid copper vs stranded copper wire if you have it...you can shape it with needle nose pliers
     
  4. thakid87

    Thread Starter Active Member

    May 23, 2009
    122
    0
    Thanks for the help. I have another cap, its just sitting behind the LM7805.

    I started soldering up last night and I really need to read up on this. Have any tips/guides I can read?

    My soldering iron, a cheap one from Advance Auto Parts, got extremely oxidized and after 30 minutes it wouldn't heat up the solder enough to melt it, at least from the tip. I tried tinning it and using a wet sponge but that only seemed to make it worse.

    I think I messed up this set of components. Oh well, this is how we learn.

    Thanks again for the help.
     
  5. Blackbull

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 26, 2008
    70
    6
    Have you tried dipping the iron into flux?
     
  6. nomurphy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 8, 2005
    567
    12
    Be sure you are using rosin/flux core solder, a lot of the solder these days doesn't contain flux. If you do have rosin free solder, buy a flux pen and add a touch to the circuit before soldering.
     
  7. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    Get a copper or stainless steel scrubbing pad. They look sort of like miniature Afro wigs. I picked up a couple for a buck in a $1 bin at an Ace Hardware store. The scrubbing pad works great to strip the corrosion off the soldering iron tip without removing the iron cladding.

    Keep the iron clean and tinned at all times. If it's been sitting for a couple of minutes, clean and re-tin. Don't leave it plugged in unless you're about to use it.
     
  8. thakid87

    Thread Starter Active Member

    May 23, 2009
    122
    0
    What if the iron is oxidized beyond the tip? Should the scrubbing be done while the iron is hot?

    Thanks for all the help, everybody.
     
  9. nomurphy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 8, 2005
    567
    12
    I used to use an Xacto knife to lightly scrape the tip (when hot) whenever it got overly mucked up, it never took much life out of the tip either. Then, use lots of of rosin core solder and a damp sponge to get the tip properly tinned and working.
     
  10. thakid87

    Thread Starter Active Member

    May 23, 2009
    122
    0
    Here's the current condition of the iron. I want to see if I can still use for a couple more months and get the soldering down before I buy something better.
     
  11. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
    6,357
    718
    solder should never get that high onto the barrel.

    Only around the front 1/8" - 1/4" of the very tip.

    If you cannot get the very tip to accept solder, make sure the screw holding the tip in is tight. If it is tight and still doesn't work, you can get a replacement tip for around $1-$2.

    Before bailling completely, you can get another little bit of use from the tip by using some sandpaper to get down through the solder to the base surface, which can then be tinned.

    Afterward, yes, I'd suggest a new iron, if you cannot find replacement tips or make this one work.
     
Loading...