Question non-related to Electronics

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by tadm123, May 16, 2014.

  1. tadm123

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 20, 2013
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    It's more of a general question and isn't about electronics but I'm guessing the question is relevant to fellow computer/electrical engineers. I just wanted some advise in what do you guys do to prevent eyes fatigue while on the job/ study.

    My eyes constantly burn because of studying/working on the computer for longs period of time. It's becoming a problem really.

    Any advise, and how do you guys personally deal with this? Thanks a lot.
     
  2. paulktreg

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 2, 2008
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    First thing I would do is an eye test?
     
  3. tadm123

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 20, 2013
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    Yeah, I will take an eye test.

    I thought this was pretty common though for anyone who has been looking at the comp screen for a long time, and wanted some input on what do you guys do to deal with this.

    Maybe it's not as common as I thought.
     
  4. Veracohr

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 3, 2011
    552
    76
    Step away from the computer every once in a while. Take a few minutes, go get a drink of water, whatever. It's not only good for resting your eyes, but it's also good to get out of the chair for a few minutes. Also, don't work in the dark where the only light is from you monitor. Have a room light on.
     
  5. Veracohr

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 3, 2011
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    I don't think that's necessary as a first step. Eye fatigue happens, it doesn't have to mean poor eyesight.
     
  6. atferrari

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
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    Ambient lights? How far, in what position (ceiling, desk, in front of you, from the side...).

    Do you need glasses? If so, do you use them? If you use reading glasses the focus for reading a book could be different from what is needed for your monitor at present distance. Even the position of the monitor staying just 10 cm higher /closer could make for a difference.

    Is the monitor too bright (or maybe the opposite...)?

    Myself, after studying for LONG hours in the Naval Academy for four years with fluorescent lights up there on the ceiling, I learnt to hate them.

    My current setup. (With eight novels by the late García Márquez under the monitor to rise it 8 cm above the desk.)
     
  7. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,570
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    +1 as the first step.
    You do not indicate an age, but regular tests are essential, as you get older cataracts and other maladies are often present, and can often be corrected by simple means.
    Max.
     
  8. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
    12,449
    3,368
    Here, take this eye test. If you can't read this you need to step away from the computer.



    [​IMG]
     
  9. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,570
    2,380

    ..Alas, were it that simple! :(
    Max.:)
     
  10. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
    3,871
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    If your eyes burn constantly, there is a problem other than the computer. See an ophthamologist.
     
  11. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    I failed my first eye test after a few years of working with monochrome monitors in the 1988. I went back a few days later and passed, so I'm assuming it was fatigue.

    I'm 60 these days and use 1.75 x reading glasses. I notice I had a problem reading the numbers of chips about a decade or so ago.

    I'm still good at distances, but closer requires the readers.
     
  12. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    My eyes burn from allergies. But for 25 years of doing this, I haven't experiences any eye issues.
     
  13. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    I use dorky magnifies with a headband, the kind you get at harbor freight over my regular glasses. Works great.
     
  14. tadm123

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 20, 2013
    43
    0
    Nope, I don't need any glasses. I'm using a white fluorescent light bulb.

    Here are some pics:

    [​IMG]

    Here's the side view:

    [​IMG]

    I put the brightness in the lowest of all in my laptop and feel comfortable with that, maybe I need to change that though.

    Maybe having an actual lamp next to me might be a better option.

    Anyways, thanks for all the replies.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2014
  15. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    13,056
    3,245
    I've spend many years at a computer screen for many hours each day without my eyes ever burning so perhaps you have an eye problem (the cure could be as simple as getting the proper eye-glasses).

    Did an ophthalmologist say you don't need glasses or is that your opinion?

    Does that table lamp shine into your eyes when you work? That can create fatigue.
     
  16. tadm123

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 20, 2013
    43
    0
    Yeah, I did an eye exam in the routine checks about 5 months ago. And had 19/20 vision. But I forgot to mention this specific burning of the eyes problem.

    And nope, the lamp doesn't shine in my eyes.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2014
  17. tadm123

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 20, 2013
    43
    0
    Yeah, I'll need to do that.

    Thanks for the responses.
     
  18. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    417
    Every 20 or 30 minutes, you really ought to at least move your eyes away from the screen and look at something far away for a minute.

    If you think about it, in nature, your eye would be constantly examining and adjusting for features close, then far, then close, then in the middle, etc etc. However, when sat reading a monitor, it is very easy to simply stare at a screen which is they same distance from your head for hours. Your eyes don't even need to move to read everything, you just scroll to it. Also, I've been told that quite often people's blinking rates slow done too. So your eyes begin to dry out slightly - which is perhaps causing the pain.

    Even when reading a book, your eyes are often doing the scrolling, and every time you turn the page, your eyes are forced to refocus, which is why people ca often read books/papers longer than read a monitor (without eye problems).

    Sparky
     
  19. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
    5,435
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    Set the room lighting to make the keyboard and paperwork the same brightness as the screen. That way your pupils don't need to readjust every time you look between the screen and keyboard etc.

    The worst thing are black keyboards, it's almost impossible to get a black keyboard the same brightness as the screen.
     
  20. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    13,056
    3,245
    Astigmatism can cause eye strain even if you otherwise have 20/20 (or 19/20) vision.
     
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