Query about Solid State Relay (ajq1341)

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Fahrad, Dec 24, 2013.

  1. Fahrad

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 28, 2011
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    I have a solid state relay which I believe could handle an 220VAC source. The problem is I'm not sure if it can carry as much as 5A (1.1kW). I have attached the image of the SSR I have so please help me. I need to make sure that I buy the correct thing to avoid throwing away money again.

    [​IMG]

    I am assuming that the 5A250V~ (so that will be ~1.25kW?) written on it is the maximum possible source it could handle. But I could be wrong. I really need to be sure. I have searched for its datasheet but I cannot understand what was written there.

    I am planning to use a light bulb and an electric fan in that relay.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. ronv

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 12, 2008
    3,281
    1,227
    Strange spec.. The way I read it the Normally open contact cans switch 5 amps but the normally closed only 2 amps. Si it should work if you use the N/O as the switch.
     
  3. Fahrad

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 28, 2011
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    I have used already both. And they're working. But the thing is, I tried it with only 5VDC source.
     
  4. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    This is a mechanical relay, not a SSR.
    the data sheet only shows for mainly resistive loads.
    Max.
     
  5. Fahrad

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 28, 2011
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    I see. I was informed that this is a SSR. My fault.

    So am I correct about the maximum possible load it could handle (5A 250V)?

    Resistive loads only? You mean it cannot handle other loads like a fan which I believe is inductive (or I got it wrong again?) ? Or the datasheet that I have posted is incomplete?
     
  6. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,634
    2,342
    Hello,

    No, the relays can NOT handle 5 A.

    From the order info, I see it is a standard spec relays:

    [​IMG]

    In the specs table there is given 1 A NC and 2A NO:

    [​IMG]

    The relays will burn if you use it with a 5 A load.

    Bertus
     
  7. Fahrad

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 28, 2011
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    Okay, okay. So I suppose I should limit the current to 1A for the NC pin and 2A for NO pin. Thank you very much!
     
  8. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Notice rating for Resistive loads.
    There is usually a de-rating factor for inductive loads, i.e. less than the resistive load rating.
    And it is Form C or Form A rating, dependent on version
    Max.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2013
  9. Fahrad

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 28, 2011
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    ^

    Now I'm confused. How do I know the "de-rating" factor of inductive loads? De-rating sounds new to me. Is it like as simple as having the inductive load current cut to 10 times lower than the supposed maximum capable load of that resistive loads? I_{inductive} = \frac{I_{resistive}}{10}

    Looks like I cannot understand what Google says.

    I will be using an incandescent light and probably a stand fan.
     
  10. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Personally I do not like using those small PCCT relays for any type of power, it is far better to use it to switch a small 'Ice Cube' relay, Omron, Idec etc, externally and use this relay for switching any power device.
    Also far easier to replace in the future if need be.
    Max.
     
  11. Fahrad

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 28, 2011
    8
    0
    Unfortunately, that is the only Relay available in our area. I don't mind replacing this in the near future. This will be good for one time use. :)
     
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